Fresh Air News

  • Researchers focus on new ways to treat asthma

    There are many factors that go into diagnosing and treating asthma. For example, one recent study examined the role that obesity plays with the condition, as patients with obesity are more likely to respond poorly to traditional asthma medications. The research, which was conducted at Boston's Children Hospital, emphasized the idea that obese individuals may need alternate or nontraditional asthma treatments. 

    "Since it's been a puzzle to understand why obesity predisposes people to asthma, our goal was to find the connection between these two problems, which occur in both children and adults, and to explore possible new treatments," said Dr. Dale Umetsu, one of the leads of the study. 

    The study found that obesity altered an individual's immune system, affecting the way in which it responded to medical treatments. Inflammation of the lungs was a common symptom, and this was often resistant to common asthma medications, leaving patients struggling to find relief. While more research needs to be done to determine the best course of action, this was a step in the right direction to identify an area of need. 

    Anyone suffering from asthma, regardless of the secondary factors, may benefit from investing in devices like the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This medical-grade home air purifier is capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants that may aggravate asthma or similar respiratory problems. 

  • Researchers focus on new ways to treat asthma

    There are many factors that go into diagnosing and treating asthma. For example, one recent study examined the role that obesity plays with the condition, as patients with obesity are more likely to respond poorly to traditional asthma medications. The research, which was conducted at Boston's Children Hospital, emphasized the idea that obese individuals may need alternate or nontraditional asthma treatments. 

    "Since it's been a puzzle to understand why obesity predisposes people to asthma, our goal was to find the connection between these two problems, which occur in both children and adults, and to explore possible new treatments," said Dr. Dale Umetsu, one of the leads of the study. 

    The study found that obesity altered an individual's immune system, affecting the way in which it responded to medical treatments. Inflammation of the lungs was a common symptom, and this was often resistant to common asthma medications, leaving patients struggling to find relief. While more research needs to be done to determine the best course of action, this was a step in the right direction to identify an area of need. 

    Anyone suffering from asthma, regardless of the secondary factors, may benefit from investing in devices like the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This medical-grade home air purifier is capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants that may aggravate asthma or similar respiratory problems. 

  • Air filters can make the ideal holiday gift

    Now that the holidays are only a few weeks away, many individuals may be searching for the right gift for their friends and family. A great option that may have been overlooked is a home air purifier. 

    For example, HEPA air purifiers can go a long way toward clearing the air of pollutants, chemicals and odors that are frequently found in a bustling home. Anyone living in close proximity to heavily trafficked areas will appreciate this gift, as it can make it easier to breathe while also improving the health of all inhabitants. 

    Of course, no one should look past doing something nice for themselves this holiday season. There's no harm in indulging in a personal gift, especially if it's one that will enhance health. Those who suffer from allergies or asthma, for instance, may benefit greatly from products like the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This medical-grade device is widely considered to be one of the best on the market, and it can be used to remove a number of common irritants and allergens from a home.

    One investment could make a major difference in the air in a home or office. Regardless of who the recipient is, air purifiers can be a great choice for gifts this holiday season. 

  • Climate change may make allergies worse

    People who have to put up with mold allergies already have a lot to deal with. The fungus can sneak up on unsuspecting individuals, growing in hidden areas at rapid rates and affecting many people with allergies. That's not all individuals need to worry about, however. Recent research found that climate change is making mold allergies worse, as it increases the presence of the allergenic protein within mold, which may wreak havoc on those with allergies. 

    According to Live Science, high levels of carbon dioxide can accelerate the growth of mold spores. The mold grown with the current amount of the gas features more than eight times as much of the allergenic protein as it did in the pre-industrial days. Should climate change continue and carbon dioxide levels rise, the presence of the allergens could become even greater, causing more problems for individuals. 

    To prepare for tougher mold allergies, those who deal with the condition should consider medical-grade devices like the IQAir HealthPro Plus. These home air purifiers can clear the air of many allergens and irritants that disrupt daily life, making it easier to complete responsibilities and enjoy their personal space. 

  • Eastern states are affected by Midwest pollution

    Air quality may differ by region, but a large influence on one area's pollution may be the manufacturing going on hundreds of miles away. According to The New York Times, states along the East Coast are suffering, as the wind carries polluted air from the Midwest, and to battle this problem many of the Eastern regions are planning on petitioning the Environmental Protection Agency to enforce stricter regulations. 

    The eight states, including New York, Connecticut and Maine, have historically had more rules regarding air pollution. They want the rest of the country to implement these regulations as well, as the pollution from Midwest factories, coal-powered plants and traffic are affecting quality of life across the country. 

    "Maine has more of a stake than most states with these laws because of our geography," Ed Miller, senior vice president for policy at the American Lung Association of the Northeast, told The Portland Press Herald. "And we have higher rates of lung disease, higher rates of asthma and we have a larger older population that tends to be more susceptible to air pollution." 

    While most residents will have to wait to see the outcome of these petitions, they can take steps to improve the air in their own homes. Air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas can go a long way toward making it easier to breathe indoors. 

  • Environmental factors could lead to heart defects in children

    Parents typically go above and beyond to keep their children safe, and often that extends to actions like purchasing a home air purifier. These devices, especially high-end models like the IQAir GC MultiGas, are effective at clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants and pollutants, which makes them ideal choices for people eager to breathe easier in a home. However, the benefits of these air filters may go beyond comfort, as environmental toxins can play a large role in children's health. 

    According to recent research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013, congenital heart defects are more likely to develop in children whose mothers were exposed to certain environmental toxins during pregnancy. While these defects may also be caused by genetic factors, the latest studies have shown a correlation between pollutants in the air with those toxins mostly stemming from metals and organic compounds commonly found in factory settings. 

    "Although still in the early stage, this research suggests some chemical emissions - particularly, industrial air emissions - may be linked to heart abnormalities that develop while the heart is forming in the womb," said Dr. Deliwe P. Ngwezi, one of the researchers involved with the study. 

  • Environmental factors could lead to heart defects in children

    Parents typically go above and beyond to keep their children safe, and often that extends to actions like purchasing a home air purifier. These devices, especially high-end models like the IQAir GC MultiGas, are effective at clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants and pollutants, which makes them ideal choices for people eager to breathe easier in a home. However, the benefits of these air filters may go beyond comfort, as environmental toxins can play a large role in children's health. 

    According to recent research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013, congenital heart defects are more likely to develop in children whose mothers were exposed to certain environmental toxins during pregnancy. While these defects may also be caused by genetic factors, the latest studies have shown a correlation between pollutants in the air with those toxins mostly stemming from metals and organic compounds commonly found in factory settings. 

    "Although still in the early stage, this research suggests some chemical emissions - particularly, industrial air emissions - may be linked to heart abnormalities that develop while the heart is forming in the womb," said Dr. Deliwe P. Ngwezi, one of the researchers involved with the study. 

  • Avoid symptoms from pet allergies

    Allergies may not be enough to convince animal lovers to say goodbye to their dogs or cats, but they can still have a significant impact on their day-to-day lives. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, as much as 10 percent of the general population and 40 percent of allergic individuals have some kind of reaction to animals. Despite the large number of people who are allergic to these animals - and more specifically, to their dander - about half of all homes in the U.S. have a dog or cat living indoors, according to National Allergy. 

    Because those who are allergic to pets have a reaction to the dander, steps must be taken to reduce exposure to these irritants. Vacuuming regularly and avoiding the use of furnishings like cloth curtains or carpets to prevent build up of dander is just the beginning.

    One investment that could have major benefits is the purchase of an air cleaner purifier. Devices like the high-end IQAir HealthPro Plus can clear the air of many irritants and allergens, resulting in an environment where it is easier to breathe. They could also help eliminate many of the symptoms of pet allergies, which include sneezing and congestion, itchy or watery eyes, coughing, wheezing and rashes. 

  • Avoid symptoms from pet allergies

    Allergies may not be enough to convince animal lovers to say goodbye to their dogs or cats, but they can still have a significant impact on their day-to-day lives. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, as much as 10 percent of the general population and 40 percent of allergic individuals have some kind of reaction to animals. Despite the large number of people who are allergic to these animals - and more specifically, to their dander - about half of all homes in the U.S. have a dog or cat living indoors, according to National Allergy. 

    Because those who are allergic to pets have a reaction to the dander, steps must be taken to reduce exposure to these irritants. Vacuuming regularly and avoiding the use of furnishings like cloth curtains or carpets to prevent build up of dander is just the beginning.

    One investment that could have major benefits is the purchase of an air cleaner purifier. Devices like the high-end IQAir HealthPro Plus can clear the air of many irritants and allergens, resulting in an environment where it is easier to breathe. They could also help eliminate many of the symptoms of pet allergies, which include sneezing and congestion, itchy or watery eyes, coughing, wheezing and rashes. 

  • Air pollution linked to autism, study shows

    There are several well-known health risks associated with air pollution, but some may go beyond allergies or respiratory issues. A recent study from researchers at the University of Southern Carolina, set to be published in the journal Epidemiology, found that exposure to air pollution increases the risk for autism among those individuals who have a genetic disposition for the disorder. 

    Although genetics are a major factor, air pollution and other environmental factors clearly play a role in the development of autism. Numerous studies have shown a relationship between air pollution and autism, and this is one of the first to focus on the instances specific to individuals with a genetic marker for the condition. 

    "Our research shows that children with both the risk genotype and exposure to high air pollutant levels were at increased risk of autism spectrum disorder compared to those without the risk genotype and lower air pollution exposure," said Dr. Heather E. Volk, the study's author, as quoted by Medical Xpress. 

    Anyone eager to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants should turn to medical-grade devices like home air purifiers. Options like the IQAir GC MultiGas are capable of eliminating chemicals and general pollution, which in turn creates a better atmosphere within a home. 

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