Fresh Air News

  • Focus on air quality to improve health

    People all over the U.S. have begun focusing on improving the air quality around their homes. While devices such as the IQAir GC MultiGas can do a lot to enhance an indoor space, making it more comfortable for individuals who just want to relax and live in their own homes, more must be done to clear the air outdoors. 

    Cleaning up the atmosphere has more advantages than just letting people breathe easier - it can also help avoid common medical problems. Pollution can be laden with carcinogens, for example, and inhaling these harmful chemicals may lead to health issues like lung cancer. Poor air quality has already been linked to asthma and similar respiratory issues, and cancer may be the next level. 

    Individuals also have to watch out for cardiovascular disease. Even short-term exposure to smoke and pollutants can impair the heart - and those chemicals are not limited to the outdoors. According to the World Health Organization, about 4.3 million deaths per year can be attributed to household air pollution, so people need to start focusing on improving this environment. HEPA air purifiers can help, and they are a great way to make a difference without making drastic changes. 

  • Prepare children for spring allergies - not colds

    While the worst of cold season may be over, there's no telling what type of illness may befall children who are running around outside, enjoying the great weather. However, there's a chance that standard spring allergies could be mistaken for colds in kids, preventing them from getting the care and medication they need.

    Investments such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus can help clear the air of a wide variety of allergens and irritants that would otherwise cause respiratory problems, but parents should be aware of the symptoms that accompany spring allergies. A study from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center noted that there are several discrepancies between the signs of allergies and colds. 

    "Runny, stuffy or itchy noses, sneezing, coughing, fatigue and headaches can all be symptoms of both allergies and colds, but when parents pay close attention to minor details they will be able to tell the difference," said Dr. Michelle Lierl, a pediatric allergist. "Children who have springtime or fall allergies have much more itching of their noses; they often have fits of sneezing and usually rub their noses in an upward motion. They also complain about an itchy, scratchy throat or itchy eyes, whereas with a cold, they don't."

    To prevent either of these issues from striking, the report recommends minimizing outdoor activities that take place in the early morning. Pollen counts tend to be higher at this time, which can cause problems for individuals with allergies.

  • Prepare children for spring allergies - not colds

    While the worst of cold season may be over, there's no telling what type of illness may befall children who are running around outside, enjoying the great weather. However, there's a chance that standard spring allergies could be mistaken for colds in kids, preventing them from getting the care and medication they need.

    Investments such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus can help clear the air of a wide variety of allergens and irritants that would otherwise cause respiratory problems, but parents should be aware of the symptoms that accompany spring allergies. A study from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center noted that there are several discrepancies between the signs of allergies and colds. 

    "Runny, stuffy or itchy noses, sneezing, coughing, fatigue and headaches can all be symptoms of both allergies and colds, but when parents pay close attention to minor details they will be able to tell the difference," said Dr. Michelle Lierl, a pediatric allergist. "Children who have springtime or fall allergies have much more itching of their noses; they often have fits of sneezing and usually rub their noses in an upward motion. They also complain about an itchy, scratchy throat or itchy eyes, whereas with a cold, they don't."

    To prevent either of these issues from striking, the report recommends minimizing outdoor activities that take place in the early morning. Pollen counts tend to be higher at this time, which can cause problems for individuals with allergies.

  • Wildfires impact air quality

    During the spring and summer, most people are more concerned about keeping their allergies in check and planning vacations than worrying about air quality. However, people across the country will have to turn their attention to the possibility of wildfires, as these events can negatively impact air quality and cause problems for individuals with respiratory problems. 

    For example, a recent wildfire in New Jersey's Burlington County spread smoke over areas across the state. It even affected cities like New York City and Philadelphia.  This may be a minor inconvenience for some, but it could pose problems for certain people. 

    "Sensitive individuals, including the young, elderly and person with respiratory diseases such as asthma, should avoid strenuous outdoor activity," the National Weather Service warned. 

    Wildfires can become particularly problematic during the summer, when high temperatures and dry conditions create the perfect environment for blazes. While being a cognizant global citizen can go a long way toward avoiding these issues, other steps, such as purchasing a home air purifier, are also smart. Devices such as the IQAir GC MultiGas are ideal for clearing an indoor space of chemicals, smoke and other forms of pollution. 

  • Asthma could lead to bone problems, study shows

    People who have been diagnosed with asthma have their hands full dealing with the symptoms of the respiratory condition that often plagues them. However, asthma may pose health issues that affect all parts of the body. 

    A study published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology noted that people with asthma or asthma-related breathing problems may be at risk for bone loss. According to the research, people who had symptoms of these conditions also had significantly lower bone density. 

    "Asthma could be a risk for bone loss," Dr. Sonal Singh told Reuters Health. "The degree to which their disease puts them at risk for bone loss and fractures needs to be further studied. We should be thinking about fractures in patients with asthma." 

    There are not any foolproof ways to prevent asthma - individuals can only hope to take steps that keep the condition in check and prevent further damage. Many choose to invest in home air purifiers such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear many irritants and allergens from the air, making it easier to breathe and decreasing the risk of an asthma attack. 

  • Prepare against extreme pollution

    The poor air quality in China is having a major impact on the rest of the world. While U.S. residents may not think they need to invest in home air purifiers, but concern about pollution and its effects are taking hold across the country. 

    According to one recent study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the air pollution in China is causing problems in the U.S. Heavy smog could be affecting weather patterns, even going as far as to make storms along the Pacific Coast worst. Erratic weather could also be another side effect. While these issues may seem like inconveniences rather than severe problems, the long-term effects may be drastic. 

    With global issues contributing to U.S. air pollution, more needs to be done to protect the environment. This will likely require sweeping changes, but individuals can start by working on improving their own personal spaces. 

    Anyone concerned about air quality, regardless of their location, should consider purchasing a device such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. This is capable of clearing smoke and chemicals from the air, creating a safer, healthier indoor space for individuals. 

  • Prepare against extreme pollution

    The poor air quality in China is having a major impact on the rest of the world. While U.S. residents may not think they need to invest in home air purifiers, but concern about pollution and its effects are taking hold across the country. 

    According to one recent study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the air pollution in China is causing problems in the U.S. Heavy smog could be affecting weather patterns, even going as far as to make storms along the Pacific Coast worst. Erratic weather could also be another side effect. While these issues may seem like inconveniences rather than severe problems, the long-term effects may be drastic. 

    With global issues contributing to U.S. air pollution, more needs to be done to protect the environment. This will likely require sweeping changes, but individuals can start by working on improving their own personal spaces. 

    Anyone concerned about air quality, regardless of their location, should consider purchasing a device such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. This is capable of clearing smoke and chemicals from the air, creating a safer, healthier indoor space for individuals. 

  • Spring allergies can trigger reactions to food

    With more than 45 million people in the U.S. dealing with at least one allergy, it's no surprise to learn that some individuals suffer from multiple. There may even be some links among those spring and food allergies. 

    According to a report from the Loyola University Health System, many individuals who have spring allergies may also have corresponding food allergies. For example, an individual who is allergic to birch often has a reaction to apples, peaches, carrots and celery. Similarly, those who are allergic to grass may also have a negative reaction to melon, tomatoes or oranges. 

    Even those who do not have preexisting diagnoses may find that harsh spring allergies trigger reactions to other foods. Therefore, it's important for all people to keep an eye on their allergies and do their best to avoid extreme conditions this spring. 

    "You cannot control the weather, but you can control your environment," said Dr. Joseph Leija, an allergist who conducts the Gottlieb Allergy Count. "Take your allergy medication and see your allergist before you experience health problems." 

    Another way of controlling the environment is by investing in medical-grade air purifiers such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear the air of many allergens, helping people feel comfortable in an indoor space. 

  • Spring allergies can trigger reactions to food

    With more than 45 million people in the U.S. dealing with at least one allergy, it's no surprise to learn that some individuals suffer from multiple. There may even be some links among those spring and food allergies. 

    According to a report from the Loyola University Health System, many individuals who have spring allergies may also have corresponding food allergies. For example, an individual who is allergic to birch often has a reaction to apples, peaches, carrots and celery. Similarly, those who are allergic to grass may also have a negative reaction to melon, tomatoes or oranges. 

    Even those who do not have preexisting diagnoses may find that harsh spring allergies trigger reactions to other foods. Therefore, it's important for all people to keep an eye on their allergies and do their best to avoid extreme conditions this spring. 

    "You cannot control the weather, but you can control your environment," said Dr. Joseph Leija, an allergist who conducts the Gottlieb Allergy Count. "Take your allergy medication and see your allergist before you experience health problems." 

    Another way of controlling the environment is by investing in medical-grade air purifiers such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear the air of many allergens, helping people feel comfortable in an indoor space. 

  • Spring allergies can lead to asthma

    The weather is finally beginning to warm up and bring touches of spring to all corners of the U.S. While this is good news for many, others may be concerned about the possibility of spring allergies wreaking havoc on their lifestyles. This is a relatively normal worry for millions, but experts say that these instances of allergies may be causing asthma flare ups in individuals. 

    "Last year, because the pollen counts were so high and the allergy seasons were bad, I had my allergy patients, who've never had asthma symptoms before, get them," Dr. Rachel Szekely of the Cleveland Clinic told KABC News. "So now they have a new diagnosis of asthma." 

    Allergies are a common trigger for asthma, leaving many patients to deal with a whole new realm of respiratory problems. Szekely noted that people with asthma are very sensitive to irritants in the air, and allergy season brings these out in full force. Luckily, individuals can turn to medical-grade devices like the IQAir HealthPro Plus for help. This HEPA air purifier clears the air of a wide variety of irritants and allergens, making it easier to breathe and find relief during the spring season. 

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