Fresh Air News

  • New EPA rule may improve air quality

    Air quality in and around cities has been a contentious issue recently, and many organizations are taking steps to improve their emissions to reduce the harm done to the environment. Most recently, the federal government has called for a change that will require sulfur to be removed from gasoline, which in turn will cut back on pollutants and smog from vehicles. 

    According to Bloomberg, this move will enhance the air quality and allow spaces to meet new health standards. While it will be expensive to implement, the benefits may outweigh this cost, especially in areas that are in close proximity to major cities and heavily trafficked areas. 

    "There are going to be significant health benefits for New Jersey and its urban communities, which are particularly hard-hit by asthma cases," Chuck Fineberg, chairman of the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition, told NorthJersey.com. 

    Individuals do not have to wait for this rule change to go into effect to begin improving their air quality. Professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including smoke and chemicals that commonly aggravate people with respiratory issues. This one step can significantly improve the air of an indoor space. 

  • New EPA rule may improve air quality

    Air quality in and around cities has been a contentious issue recently, and many organizations are taking steps to improve their emissions to reduce the harm done to the environment. Most recently, the federal government has called for a change that will require sulfur to be removed from gasoline, which in turn will cut back on pollutants and smog from vehicles. 

    According to Bloomberg, this move will enhance the air quality and allow spaces to meet new health standards. While it will be expensive to implement, the benefits may outweigh this cost, especially in areas that are in close proximity to major cities and heavily trafficked areas. 

    "There are going to be significant health benefits for New Jersey and its urban communities, which are particularly hard-hit by asthma cases," Chuck Fineberg, chairman of the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition, told NorthJersey.com. 

    Individuals do not have to wait for this rule change to go into effect to begin improving their air quality. Professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including smoke and chemicals that commonly aggravate people with respiratory issues. This one step can significantly improve the air of an indoor space. 

  • Asthma could be tied to sleeping problems, study shows

    Breathing problems, whether due to asthma, allergies or even a common cold, can wreak havoc on sleep patterns. Unfortunately, recent research has found that medications intended to improve these conditions may also lead to trouble getting a full night's sleep. 

    According to a recent study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, common asthma medications may raise the risk of sleep apnea in patients, HealthDay News reported. Sleep apnea, a condition characterized by periodic lapses of breathing during sleep, can lead to a range of other health issues, including hypertension, stroke and heart problems. 

    Health Newsline reported that the small study found that medications may make the throat and tongue more "floppy," which in turn leads to the blocking of the airway when laying down. The culprit appears to be inhaled corticosteroids, such as those present in an inhaler. 

    For some individuals with asthma, formal medications are the only way to find relief. However, others who are concerned with respiratory issues may be able to breathe easier with the help of medical-grade home air purifiers. Devices such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus can aid by clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants and allergens that frequently cause problems. 

  • Asthma patients may be overmedicating, study shows

    People with asthma often need medications, inhalers and other treatments to make it through the day. According to Science World Report, a recent study found that many of these medications may actually be harming individuals.

    Overusing these treatments can lead to dependence on inhalers, and it may also weaken bones or cause other health risks, the news source reported. Related health problems could include cataracts and negative effects on blood pressure. It may also drive up personal costs for patients. 

    "We need to find a way to help patients control their asthma, without overmedicating them," said Dr. John Mastronarde, the director of the Asthma Center at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center, as quoted by Live Science. "...  Once you get the symptoms under control, sometimes both the patient and the doctor just leave the patient on whatever they are on, because they don't want it to get worse again." 

    While many individuals need medications to treat asthma, some may find that home air purifiers, such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus, make a significant difference indoors. The medical-grade devices can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, making it easier to breathe in a space without aggravating respiratory issues. 

  • Asthma patients may be overmedicating, study shows

    People with asthma often need medications, inhalers and other treatments to make it through the day. According to Science World Report, a recent study found that many of these medications may actually be harming individuals.

    Overusing these treatments can lead to dependence on inhalers, and it may also weaken bones or cause other health risks, the news source reported. Related health problems could include cataracts and negative effects on blood pressure. It may also drive up personal costs for patients. 

    "We need to find a way to help patients control their asthma, without overmedicating them," said Dr. John Mastronarde, the director of the Asthma Center at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center, as quoted by Live Science. "...  Once you get the symptoms under control, sometimes both the patient and the doctor just leave the patient on whatever they are on, because they don't want it to get worse again." 

    While many individuals need medications to treat asthma, some may find that home air purifiers, such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus, make a significant difference indoors. The medical-grade devices can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, making it easier to breathe in a space without aggravating respiratory issues. 

  • Weather patterns may lead to early allergy season

    Most people with allergies dread the period of spring when the temperature begins warming up, as it leads to bunches of pollen and other allergens floating through the air. While this is largely unavoidable, it is also predictable, as those diagnosed with allergies know what to expect when they step outdoors. However, the strange weather patterns that have been present this winter may be bringing the allergies around earlier in the year. 

    According to WTOP News, the up-and-down weather experienced by much of the country may cause some plants to begin pollinating early. Because the polar vortex brought freezing temperatures to the bulk of the U.S., including areas that don't typically get that cold, plants may have already had the necessary chilling period. Once the weather begins improving, these plants may start producing pollen. 

    Although the bulk of the worst allergy days may still be slated for later in the spring, individuals with allergies should be aware of the challenges they face when they step outside. 

    Individuals who want to prepare for the threat of allergies should consider investing in a medical-grade home air purifier such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear the air of a wide variety of allergens and irritants, which will make it easier to breathe indoors. 

  • Weather patterns may lead to early allergy season

    Most people with allergies dread the period of spring when the temperature begins warming up, as it leads to bunches of pollen and other allergens floating through the air. While this is largely unavoidable, it is also predictable, as those diagnosed with allergies know what to expect when they step outdoors. However, the strange weather patterns that have been present this winter may be bringing the allergies around earlier in the year. 

    According to WTOP News, the up-and-down weather experienced by much of the country may cause some plants to begin pollinating early. Because the polar vortex brought freezing temperatures to the bulk of the U.S., including areas that don't typically get that cold, plants may have already had the necessary chilling period. Once the weather begins improving, these plants may start producing pollen. 

    Although the bulk of the worst allergy days may still be slated for later in the spring, individuals with allergies should be aware of the challenges they face when they step outside. 

    Individuals who want to prepare for the threat of allergies should consider investing in a medical-grade home air purifier such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear the air of a wide variety of allergens and irritants, which will make it easier to breathe indoors. 

  • Air pollution may lead to hypertension in pregnant women

    Air pollution can cause significant health problems, and those medical issues may only be exacerbated if the individual in question is pregnant. These women have to pay attention to a number of health risks, as new research shows that breathing polluted air may be just as harmful to women and their unborn children as cigarette smoke. 

    According to a recent study from the University of Florida, which was published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, exposure to air pollutants raises the risk of hypertension in pregnant women. In turn, this can lead to several more severe problems, such as preeclampsia. 

    "Fetal development is very sensitive to environmental factors," said Dr. Xiaohui Xu, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Florida. "This is why we wanted to do this research. Hypertension (high blood pressure), in particular, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, causing a lot of problems for the mother and fetus, including preterm delivery." 

    One proactive approach to treating air pollution is to invest in a professional-grade home air purifier, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. Capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants, including chemicals, smoke and various odors, these devices are ideal for individuals who want to enhance an indoor space. 

  • Air pollution may lead to hypertension in pregnant women

    Air pollution can cause significant health problems, and those medical issues may only be exacerbated if the individual in question is pregnant. These women have to pay attention to a number of health risks, as new research shows that breathing polluted air may be just as harmful to women and their unborn children as cigarette smoke. 

    According to a recent study from the University of Florida, which was published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, exposure to air pollutants raises the risk of hypertension in pregnant women. In turn, this can lead to several more severe problems, such as preeclampsia. 

    "Fetal development is very sensitive to environmental factors," said Dr. Xiaohui Xu, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Florida. "This is why we wanted to do this research. Hypertension (high blood pressure), in particular, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, causing a lot of problems for the mother and fetus, including preterm delivery." 

    One proactive approach to treating air pollution is to invest in a professional-grade home air purifier, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. Capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants, including chemicals, smoke and various odors, these devices are ideal for individuals who want to enhance an indoor space. 

  • Air pollution may cause neurological problems, research shows

    There are many risks associated with air pollution, but exposure to these harmful particles could be more severe than previously thought. 

    A panel at the recent American Association for the Advancement of Sciences conference discussed the concept that breathing in air pollution could lead to medical issues involving the brain. Researchers noted that constant exposure to pollution can enlarge the brain's ventricles, a condition that is commonly found in individuals with neurological disorders like autism or schizophrenia. 

    Although more research needs to be done to see if pollution could lead to these problems, people who are consistently breathing in smaller, dangerous particles could be facing significant threats to their health. 

    "The component people worry about the most are the smallest particles – the ultrafine particles," Dr. Deborah Cory-Slechta, organizer of the panel, told FoxNews.com. "And the reason is because those go all the way down into the bottom of the lung. Once they get to the bottom of the lung, they can be absorbed into the blood stream."

    Individuals who are concerned about breathing in polluted air may want to invest in a medical-grade product like the IQAir GC MultiGas. This home air purifier can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants and airborne particles that could otherwise be harmful. 

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