Fresh Air News

  • Allergy season has already arrived

    People all across the U.S. have spent the past several months dealing with frigid temperatures, heavy snow drifts and all-around miserable weather. Despite the fact that these winter staples are fresh in the minds of many, spring is just around the corner, and with its arrival will come allergy season. 

    New research from the Montefiore Medical Center found that, even with this past winter being one of the coldest in recent history, allergy season has already started. The beginning of the first pollen season means certain trees are beginning to pollinate, and that leads to allergens are circulating at a high rate. 

    "Even with snow still on the ground, trees have started budding and are the first to produce pollen, creating major problems for people with allergies," said Dr. David Rosenstreich, director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Montefiore Medical Center. "The symptoms people experience often resemble a common cold, but, if it happens every year at this time, it's most likely allergies." 

    As allergy season inches closer, individuals with these health problems will want to make sure they are ready to handle anything. That's where home air purifiers like the IQAir HealthPro Plus come into play, as these medical-grade devices can dramatically improve an indoor space. 

  • Study shows preterm birth may lead to asthma

    Numerous studies have linked environmental and health conditions during pregnancy to issues that develop once the child is born. The latest research, which comes from Brigham and Women's Hospital, found that preterm births, which are classified as any child born before 37 weeks of pregnancy, may be related to an increased risk of asthma and similar wheezing disorders. 

    Of the 1.5 million preterm births studied, more than 13 percent of the cases saw the child develop asthma or a related condition. That is significantly more than the 8.3 percent of babies born at term. 

    "As asthma is a chronic condition, our findings underscore the need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the association between preterm birth and asthma/wheezing disorders in order to develop preventive and therapeutic interventions," said Dr. Aziz Sheikh, one of the study's authors.

    While asthma may be more common in preterm children, it can affect anyone at any time. To make it easier to breathe and find comfort indoors, many people invest in medical-grade products such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. This air cleaner purifier clears the air of a wide variety of irritants that could otherwise aggravate individuals with respiratory issues. 

  • Research shows allergies are everywhere

    A common thought among the general public is that living in certain areas of the world will result in the development of allergies. People regularly flock to the dry air of places like the Southwest region to ease respiratory problems, and while this lifestyle change may be beneficial for some, it does not necessarily mean individuals can run from allergies. 

    New research from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences found that allergy prevalence remains relatively stable across the country. In fact, the only major difference that arises based on geography is what the individual becomes allergic too, as that tends to vary based on the region. 

    "Before this study, if you would have asked 10 allergy specialists if allergy prevalence varied depending on where people live, all 10 of them would have said yes, because allergen exposures tend to be more common in certain regions of the U.S.," said Dr. Darryl Zeldin of the NIEHS. "This study suggests that people prone to developing allergies are going to develop an allergy to whatever is in their environment." 

    Because allergies may affect any individual, investing in the right devices to improve an indoor space may be a smart choice. Air purifiers such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus can clear the air of many allergens and irritants, helping people with allergies breathe easier in their homes. 

  • Study finds September is the worst month for asthma

    Individuals with asthma may find themselves encountering trouble during any time of the year. Whether it is because of the pollen in the air during spring, the intense outdoor activities done in the summer or the falling leaves of autumn, these people have a lot to keep in mind as they strive to keep their respiratory health in top shape. 

    A recent study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that September is the month with the highest incidence of asthma in children. According to HealthDay, the number of flare ups were twice as high in this month as they were in August. 

    Much of this may be associated with the move back to school, as kids must adjust to entirely new environment and its irritants. This, combined with the suddenly cooler weather and lots of time spent outdoors, may contribute to the severity of asthma in children. 

    While September may be the worst month for asthma patients, the rest of the year is not exactly stress-free either. To prepare for these seasons, many invest in medical-grade air purifiers such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear the air of many allergens and irritants that otherwise aggravate asthma. 

  • Study finds September is the worst month for asthma

    Individuals with asthma may find themselves encountering trouble during any time of the year. Whether it is because of the pollen in the air during spring, the intense outdoor activities done in the summer or the falling leaves of autumn, these people have a lot to keep in mind as they strive to keep their respiratory health in top shape. 

    A recent study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that September is the month with the highest incidence of asthma in children. According to HealthDay, the number of flare ups were twice as high in this month as they were in August. 

    Much of this may be associated with the move back to school, as kids must adjust to entirely new environment and its irritants. This, combined with the suddenly cooler weather and lots of time spent outdoors, may contribute to the severity of asthma in children. 

    While September may be the worst month for asthma patients, the rest of the year is not exactly stress-free either. To prepare for these seasons, many invest in medical-grade air purifiers such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear the air of many allergens and irritants that otherwise aggravate asthma. 

  • New study examines link between traffic pollution and the heart

    The fact that pollution can have negative health effects is common knowledge. However, not many people are aware of just what traffic-related pollution does to the body and specifically to the heart. 

    According to the study, although a link between traffic-related air pollution and heart issues had been previously established, little research focused on the actual effects of the exposure. The recent report, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Maintenance, further examined the impact of pollution on the organ. 

    After examining nearly 4,000 participants, the study concluded that traffic pollution has a connection to changes in the mass of the heart, especially in the right ventricle. This is in addition to the already-established correlation between pollution and heart disease and heart failure. 

    Because the air pollution stemming from traffic has already proven to have a negative impact on society, individuals should be taking steps to decrease its effect. One way to do this is by investing in a professional-grade device like the IQAir GC MultiGas. This home air purifier can clear the air of many pollutants and chemicals, making for a more comfortable and healthy indoor space. 

  • New study examines link between traffic pollution and the heart

    The fact that pollution can have negative health effects is common knowledge. However, not many people are aware of just what traffic-related pollution does to the body and specifically to the heart. 

    According to the study, although a link between traffic-related air pollution and heart issues had been previously established, little research focused on the actual effects of the exposure. The recent report, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Maintenance, further examined the impact of pollution on the organ. 

    After examining nearly 4,000 participants, the study concluded that traffic pollution has a connection to changes in the mass of the heart, especially in the right ventricle. This is in addition to the already-established correlation between pollution and heart disease and heart failure. 

    Because the air pollution stemming from traffic has already proven to have a negative impact on society, individuals should be taking steps to decrease its effect. One way to do this is by investing in a professional-grade device like the IQAir GC MultiGas. This home air purifier can clear the air of many pollutants and chemicals, making for a more comfortable and healthy indoor space. 

  • New EPA rule may improve air quality

    Air quality in and around cities has been a contentious issue recently, and many organizations are taking steps to improve their emissions to reduce the harm done to the environment. Most recently, the federal government has called for a change that will require sulfur to be removed from gasoline, which in turn will cut back on pollutants and smog from vehicles. 

    According to Bloomberg, this move will enhance the air quality and allow spaces to meet new health standards. While it will be expensive to implement, the benefits may outweigh this cost, especially in areas that are in close proximity to major cities and heavily trafficked areas. 

    "There are going to be significant health benefits for New Jersey and its urban communities, which are particularly hard-hit by asthma cases," Chuck Fineberg, chairman of the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition, told NorthJersey.com. 

    Individuals do not have to wait for this rule change to go into effect to begin improving their air quality. Professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including smoke and chemicals that commonly aggravate people with respiratory issues. This one step can significantly improve the air of an indoor space. 

  • New EPA rule may improve air quality

    Air quality in and around cities has been a contentious issue recently, and many organizations are taking steps to improve their emissions to reduce the harm done to the environment. Most recently, the federal government has called for a change that will require sulfur to be removed from gasoline, which in turn will cut back on pollutants and smog from vehicles. 

    According to Bloomberg, this move will enhance the air quality and allow spaces to meet new health standards. While it will be expensive to implement, the benefits may outweigh this cost, especially in areas that are in close proximity to major cities and heavily trafficked areas. 

    "There are going to be significant health benefits for New Jersey and its urban communities, which are particularly hard-hit by asthma cases," Chuck Fineberg, chairman of the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition, told NorthJersey.com. 

    Individuals do not have to wait for this rule change to go into effect to begin improving their air quality. Professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including smoke and chemicals that commonly aggravate people with respiratory issues. This one step can significantly improve the air of an indoor space. 

  • Asthma could be tied to sleeping problems, study shows

    Breathing problems, whether due to asthma, allergies or even a common cold, can wreak havoc on sleep patterns. Unfortunately, recent research has found that medications intended to improve these conditions may also lead to trouble getting a full night's sleep. 

    According to a recent study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, common asthma medications may raise the risk of sleep apnea in patients, HealthDay News reported. Sleep apnea, a condition characterized by periodic lapses of breathing during sleep, can lead to a range of other health issues, including hypertension, stroke and heart problems. 

    Health Newsline reported that the small study found that medications may make the throat and tongue more "floppy," which in turn leads to the blocking of the airway when laying down. The culprit appears to be inhaled corticosteroids, such as those present in an inhaler. 

    For some individuals with asthma, formal medications are the only way to find relief. However, others who are concerned with respiratory issues may be able to breathe easier with the help of medical-grade home air purifiers. Devices such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus can aid by clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants and allergens that frequently cause problems. 

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