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Pollution

  • California national park affected by air pollution

    Most people head to national parks around the country to take in the wonders of nature and enjoy breathing in plenty of fresh air. However, clean air is one aspect of visiting a park that is being challenged at Devils Postpile National Monument in California.

    According to a recent study published in the journal Atmospheric Environment, research shows air pollution from forest fires as well as nearby industrial plants and vehicle emissions have lowered the air quality at the national monument. 

    "These findings are important for Sierra Nevada air and land managers and indicate that even at remote eastern Sierra locations, ozone air pollution may be a problem for human and ecosystem health," said Dr. Andrzej Bytnerowicz, the study's lead author. "Due to these potential risks, there is a need for long-term ozone monitoring in the Sierra Nevada in general, but especially in the areas with high local population and many summer recreational visitors."

    This study, along with other information gathered by the American Lung Association, shows more needs to be done to help lower air pollution levels stateside. According to the American Lung Association, nearly 50 million Americans live in counties with frequent spikes in particle pollution levels. 

    Families can keep such air pollution out of their homes by investing in an air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas.

  • Extended exposure to traffic pollution tied to heart disease

    Sitting in traffic is not only a nuisance for drivers around the nation, it can also lead to complications with their health. Air pollution caused by car emissions and chemical plants can up a person's chances of developing respiratory conditions and more, the World Health Organization reports. 

    A new study conducted by scientists from the West-German Heart Center discovered a link between fine particle matter (PM), in part caused by air pollution, and a higher risk of developing heart disease.

    Researchers came to this conclusion after reviewing data involving more than 4,800 participants with an average age of 60 at the start of the study. During trials, scientists calculated how close seniors lived to high-traffic roads, while their long-term exposure to PM was addressed by using a chemistry transport model. 

    The data found that for every increase in PM, and how close participants lived to high traffic roads, patients chances of developing heart disease increased. 

    Since it's well known that air pollution is negative to one's health and new information further proves this point, it might be smart for families living near busy roads to invest in professional-grade air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas to ward off potential health problems.

  • Switching to alternative power sources crucial in fight against air pollution

    With Earth Day 2013 right around the corner, more Americans might be looking into ways to reduce their carbon footprint and protect the environment. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, air pollution affects people's health, causing or irritating conditions like asthma and the environment. Chemicals in the air can also damage trees, wildlife and bodies of water. 

    Now, Reuters is reporting that air pollution is growing even more dangerous. U.N. officials announced air pollution kills more people than both AIDS and malaria, making finding a solution to the issue of the utmost importance. Members of the U.N. Industrial Development Organization met at a conference in Oslo recently to help spark conversations on countries investing more in alternative power sources like solar, wind and hydropower.

    Investing in such power sources could result in the slowing of climate change in more than 200 countries since the majority of these nations have issues with air pollution because of built-up greenhouse gases, the officials told the news outlet. 

    Even though there is a long way to go before the U.S. would consider switching to alternative energy sources, families can improve the health of their loved ones now. Installing a medical-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 can ensure people breathe only the cleanest air while relaxing in their homes. 

  • Birth defects could be tied to air pollution

    Air pollution is a growing problem in the U.S. - more than 4 in 10 people around the nation live in regions with unhealthful levels of ozone or particle pollution, the American Lung Association reports. Even though scientists are continuing to look for ways to prevent such exposure, a new study might encourage experts to kick finding a solution into high gear.

    The recent study, published in "The American Journal of Epidemiology," used two large trials to look for incidents of birth defects and levels of air pollution among kids born in eight counties of the San Joaquin Valley in California. One study tracked all birth defects since 1997, while the other featured records of levels of nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide and other air pollution components at 20 locations since 1970.

    From the data, scientists discovered there were 849 cases of birth defects after they adjusted for issues like smoking or drinking during pregnancy. Researchers then compared these children with 853 healthy control kids. Looking closer, it was found that women who lived in areas with the highest levels of carbon monoxide or nitrogen oxide were twice as likely to deliver a baby with certain birth defects in comparison to mothers living in areas with the lowest concentrations. 

    Even though the data is alarming, scientists are quick to point out that much more research needs to be conducted to verify the results. However, parents can still take added measures to protect their children now by installing a medical-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal AG800 to ensure loved ones breathe easy at home.

  • Pollutants may play a role in demise of the bumblebee

    The bumblebee population has been declining in recent years, and many experts are worried about the bug's potential disappearance. Scientists have many theories on what's behind the demise of the bumblebee, though a new study shows pollution from car exhaust and industrial plants could be partly to blame. 

    The study, published in the journal Environmental Pollution, researched bumblebees' behavior and how they reacted to flowers contaminated with metals like nickel and aluminum, common pollutants in the air, and flowers free from the contaminants. From the data, scientists discovered the bees seemed to recognize when a flower was polluted with certain metals, but only after they had visited the blooms. This shows they are already subject to exposure, even if they don't go on to get nectar from polluted plants. 

    Since pollution from cars and industrial plants has the capability to greatly affect the entire bumblebee population, some may wonder what such problems might do to people. The Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health reports environmental pollutants like air pollution from traffic and pesticides, for example, put kids at a greater risk of developing respiratory conditions like asthma, cognitive defects and certain types of cancer. 

    Parents worried about the health of their families might want to install a professional-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 into their homes to keep toxins out. 

  • Traffic pollution tied to childhood asthma

    Asthma is one of the most common conditions children are faced with - the disease affects more than 7 million youths to date, according to the American Lung Association. There are many causes behind asthma, ranging from secondhand smoke to allergies, though a new study has found that road traffic pollution may also be partly to blame.

    Scientists from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute came to this conclusion after reviewing the population-attributable fractions to assess' childhood asthma rates in 10 European countries. Population-attributable fractions refer to the risk of a child developing asthma based on how close he or she lives to busy roads and high-traffic areas.

    From the data it was discovered that 14 percent of asthma cases found were "due to exposure to traffic pollution near busy roads." This means air pollution could have a similar role in childhood asthma as secondhand smoke. The latter is linked to between 4 and 18 percent of all child asthma cases, according to the study.

    Parents may not be able to control where they live, but they can ensure their children are breathing in the cleanest air possible at home by installing a professional-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal Plus AG850.

  • Wisconsin coal plant set to install new pollution control system

    A company that was once fined for failing to comply with the Clean Air Act is now on its way to becoming one of the leaders in the air pollution lowering game. The Journal Sentinel reports Wisconsin Public Service Corporation (WPS), based out of Green Bay, recently got approval to install a sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide lowering system that is already heavily used in Japan.

    More specifically, the system, known as ReACT, costs $275 million to install, and will reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide by up to 90 percent and lower nitrogen oxide levels by between 20 and 60 percent. WPS decided to look into this plan after it was faced with a lawsuit claiming it violated the Clean Air Act by failing to install pollution control systems in the coal plant years ago.

    Installing the ReACT system in the coal company could be a step in the right direction. The Union of Concerned Scientists reports coal plants are the top source of carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S., and are the leading cause of smog, acid rain and toxic air pollution.

    Finding ways to lower the air pollution levels caused by coal plants is an important step in helping people enjoy fresher air, but it could take awhile to implement changes around the nation. For now,  those who are concerned about the harmful effects of air pollution can install a professional-grade air purifier like Airgle PurePal AG800 in their homes to ensure their families breathe easy while in their private dwellings. 

  • EPA changes air quality index

    Air pollution is on the rise around the nation, making it more crucial than ever for the government to find a way to curb or prevent the issue. The Tribune reports that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced its plans to change the current Air Quality Index levels. 

    Under the change, the EPA will lessen the air quality rates from 15 to 12 micrograms per cubic meter. Lowering the rates will mean different cities around the country will likely see more days that are considered "moderate" in terms of air quality.

    AIRNow reports the Air Quality Index is meant to tell residents how clean or polluted the air in their region is on a daily basis. Levels that are between 0 and 50 are considered "good" in terms of how healthy the air is, while levels from 51 to 100 are deemed "moderate" and levels between 101 and 150 are pegged as "unhealthy for sensitive groups." Any levels over 151 are listed as various forms of "unhealthy." Looking closer, the website reports days considered moderate mean air quality is acceptable, but pollutants in the air could be of concern for people who are "unusually sensitive to air pollution."

    Since the change in air quality levels will soon go into effect, it might be smart for families who suffer from the side effects of air pollution to invest in an air purifier like the Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 to breathe easy in the home.

  • Study finds no link between air pollution and rheumatoid arthritis

    Air pollution is a serious problem that seems to be getting worse, leading many people to install professional-grade air purifiers like the Airgle PurePal Plus AG850 to breathe easy at home. Despite the growing issue, a new study has found unhealthy air can be crossed off the list of possible reasons behind rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    Researchers have long believed that there could be a link between the form of arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease leading to inflammation of the joints, and air pollution. However, a new study may have debunked this idea. 

    Scientists from Brigham and Women's Hospital used the Nurses' Health Study, which has the medical records of more than 11.400 women from between 1976 and 2006, to look for RA incidents and a possible link to air pollution. A total of 858 women developed RA over the course of 30 years. Researchers used these participants' mailing addresses to gauge how close they lived to places of high air pollution as well as other known pollutant-makers like power plants and highways. 

    Overall, the researchers found no solid link between RA and air pollution. However, the authors are quick to point out that more trials need to be conducted to verify the recent findings.

    Even if there is no real connection to RA, air pollution can lead to a number of other serious medical conditions. Most recently, scientists from Rice University found cardiac arrest incidents went up on days when air pollution levels were above average. 

  • College student comes up with plan to deal with air pollution

    Air pollution continues to be a major problem as it can not only affect how people breathe, it can also lead to serious medical conditions like asthma, allergies and even more serious respiratory illness, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. 

    Since issues with air pollution continue to come up, more researchers from around the globe are looking into ways to curb the side effects. The Times of India reports that Vijay Raj, a college student at Kalasalingam University, recently came up with a model that could combat air pollution. 

    Raj, a mechanical engineering student, created a model in which smoke and water mix together to create carbonic acid, which occurs when hydrogen in the water reacts with carbon dioxide, the news source reports. This procedure has been found to eliminate pollution and offer benefits as well. 

    "The carbonic acid could be used to generate electricity. The residue carbon could be used in carbon-based industries,'' Raj told the news source.

    Even though there could be a way to use Raj's method to rid cities of air pollution in the future, there are other ways families can enjoy fresh air now. Installing a medical grade air purifier like Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 in the home helps ensure people breathe easy in their dwellings.

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