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Pollution

  • Air pollution can cause problems during pregnancy

    Pregnant women will stop at nothing to ensure the health and safety of their unborn child. Unfortunately, some of the very dangers they could be trying to get away from may be in the air they breathe. A recent study conducted by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University found that air pollution, combined with maternal psychological distress, can have a significant effect on the behavioral development of the child. 

    Published in the journal Pediatrics, the study claims that air pollution from sources like vehicles, heating systems and tobacco smoke are often tied to issues such as attention problems, anxiety and aggressive behavior. Symptoms were typically found in the children of women who had some sort of emotional and psychological distress during pregnancy. 

    "This study shows that the combination of physical and psychosocial stressors during fetal development magnifies the effect of each exposure," said Dr. Frederica Perera, the lead author of the study. "The findings are of concern because attention problems and anxiety and depression have been shown to affect peer relationships, academic performance and future well-being of children." 

    Anyone concerned about pollutants affecting their home should consider investing in professional-grade air purifiers. Options like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants. 

  • Study links air pollution to heart disease

    Many individuals who lead a healthy lifestyle may think they are taking their future into their own hands. However, a recent study found that air pollution could increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attacks, potentially undoing all of the benefits of healthy living. 

    Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley conducted a study that identified the common air pollutant ozone as a possible contributor to the threat of heart disease. According to The Daily Californian, exposure to ozone, which acts as a harmful smog in the lower atmosphere, could be the cause of thousands of deaths and health issues around the country. 

    These experts believe pollution hardens arteries throughout the body, which in turn reduces blood flow and makes it more difficult for the heart to do its job effectively. This can lead to heart attack, stroke or other acute cardiovascular issues, The New York Times reported. 

    Those who want to make sure their hard work is not being threatened by pollution should consider investing in a professional-grade home air purifier. The IQAir GC MultiGas is ideal for cutting down on pollution and chemicals in the home, which may help improve personal health in the long run. 

  • Many Americans live near roads with high air pollution

    Individuals may take steps to keep pollution and chemicals out of your home, but the proximity of a house to major roads could be a significant factor in the amount of toxins found within it. A recent study from a researcher at the University of New Mexico, published in the journal Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, examined just how the location of a home and pollution levels are connected. 

    According to the study, almost one-fifth of the U.S. population lives within 500 meters, or 1,640 feet, of heavy traffic. That includes about 35 million people who live within 300 feet of a major roadway. While this proximity may be convenient for transportation, it exposes residents to a variety of pollutants that can cause asthma and even lung cancer, the Los Angeles Times reported. 

    The state with the largest portion of residents living in polluted areas was California. According to the study, about 40 percent of the population in The Golden State lives close to a busy road that could be a source of pollution. Despite the number of people close to these problem areas, little is currently being done to monitor air pollution in regions across the country. 

    To cut down on the pollutants that are present in a home, invest in air purifiers. Products like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, making it easy to keep the atmosphere inside a home clean and safe while also decreasing the chance of suffering from certain health issues. 

  • Incense smoke has similar side effects as smoking

    Burning incense has been a popular method of freshening up a room for centuries. While the technique is somewhat popular in the U.S., it's more widely used in Arabian Gulf countries, where two main varieties - Oudh and Bakhoor- are more commonly known. Scientists from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill recently tested the health risks of these types of incense to see if using them indoors poses any threats.

    During their trials, researchers "identified and measured" the particles and gases emitted from these types of incense and reviewed how the emissions affected lung cells taken from participants from the United Arab Emirates. Lung cells were exposed to one of the two popular varieties of incense for three hours and were then left in the rooms for a total of 24 hours to check for any damage or concerns.

    From the data, scientists found both types of incense spread "significant amounts" of various particles, including carbon monoxide, formaldehyde and oxides of nitrogen, which can lead to inflammation in the lungs. Other side effects include eye, nose, throat and skin irritation as well as respiratory issues similar to those faced by smokers. 

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that smoking causes more than 440,000 deaths in the U.S. annually. Since incense use could hold similar threats, it might be smart for users to burn the products outside or invest in a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas to breathe easier in the home.

  • Know the signs of smog to breathe better in summer

    Once the weather warms up, most people head outdoors to spend time enjoying the wonders of nature. Even though traveling to the park to play games or trekking to campgrounds to set up tents for the weekend can be fun, if the air quality is poor, these outings can spell trouble. According to the Washington State Department of Health, a combination of hot, humid air, car exhaust and camp fire smoke can raise the levels of air pollution, making it harder for people to breathe.

    "We want people to be aware of the risks and know how to protect themselves from health problems related to poor air quality," said Maryanne Guichard, the assistant secretary of environmental public health.

    Symptoms of smog or unhealthy levels of population in the air include coughing or wheezing, watery or irritated eyes and runny noses. These conditions can be even worse for people with asthma, making it harder for these individuals to enjoy being outside.

    Since more than 18 million Americans are already living with asthma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it could be smart for these people to take certain precautions to protect their health in summer. Avoiding outdoor activities on high smog days is one way to curb asthma side effects, as is installing a medical-grade air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas to breathe clean air at home.

  • Know the signs of smog to breathe better in summer

    Once the weather warms up, most people head outdoors to spend time enjoying the wonders of nature. Even though traveling to the park to play games or trekking to campgrounds to set up tents for the weekend can be fun, if the air quality is poor, these outings can spell trouble. According to the Washington State Department of Health, a combination of hot, humid air, car exhaust and camp fire smoke can raise the levels of air pollution, making it harder for people to breathe.

    "We want people to be aware of the risks and know how to protect themselves from health problems related to poor air quality," said Maryanne Guichard, the assistant secretary of environmental public health.

    Symptoms of smog or unhealthy levels of population in the air include coughing or wheezing, watery or irritated eyes and runny noses. These conditions can be even worse for people with asthma, making it harder for these individuals to enjoy being outside.

    Since more than 18 million Americans are already living with asthma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it could be smart for these people to take certain precautions to protect their health in summer. Avoiding outdoor activities on high smog days is one way to curb asthma side effects, as is installing a medical-grade air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas to breathe clean air at home.

  • Air pollution could be tied to appendicitis

    In most cases, appendicitis is caused by a blockage, including a stool, foreign body or in some incidents, cancer, of the appendix, according to WebMD. Blockages can also be cause by infection. While these issues are well known, a new study indicates that air pollution could also be to blame for the common condition.

    Scientists from the University of Calgary published their recent findings in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. During trials, researchers analyzed the medical records of more than 35,000 patients who were hospitalized for appendicitis in one of 12 Canadian cities between 2004 and 2008. Scientists compared the medical records to air pollution data from each city to calculate how much pollution each person was exposed to near the time of their medical emergency. 

    From the data, it was discovered that the number of people who had appendicitis increased when ozone levels were higher than normal. In fact, for each 16 parts per billion increase in air pollution, the number of ruptured appendix cases increased by between 11 and 22 percent. 

    Even though there is no way to prevent appendicitis, families can limit air pollution exposure at home by investing in a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas

  • China's air pollution woes worsening

    It is no secret that China has one of the worst air pollution problems in the world, but new data suggests that the issue may be even more serious than previously thought. According to Bloomberg, some parts of China reported levels of airborne pollutants at more than three times the safe levels recommended by the World Health Organization.

    The maximum safe limit for airborne particulate matter is 25 micrograms per cubic meter, but in 74 Chinese cities, levels routinely exceeded 76 micrograms for much of the first six months of 2013. Many of the worst-affected cities were found to be in the northern province of Hebei, one of China's most heavily industrialized areas and a key part the country's steel manufacturing sector.

    According to the Xinhua news agency, China's southern provinces experienced significantly less air pollution last month than northern regions. In particular, the Pearl River Delta, an urban agglomeration in southern China, reported acceptable levels of airborne pollutants for most of June.

    China's pollution crisis is significantly worse than conditions in the U.S., but the need to ensure air quality is as high as possible is no less serious. Concerned individuals may want to invest in an IQAir GC MultiGas medical-grade air filtration system for their home, particularly if they or their family members suffer from respiratory ailments such as asthma.

  • Obama evaluating environmental impact of Keystone pipeline

    Although the issue of creating jobs and promoting economic growth is never far from the headlines, the controversy surrounding the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline has proven particularly divisive. In his latest comments on the matter, President Barack Obama reiterated that the environmental impact of the project remains a top priority for his administration, reports The New York Times.

    The key issue at stake is the amount of carbon that will be deposited into the atmosphere if construction of the pipeline proceeds. Recognizing the fact that atmospheric carbon pollution is already a serious problem in many parts of the U.S., Obama said he would only authorize the project if the pipeline does not "significantly exacerbate" levels of carbon in the air. He added that Canada, where the Keystone XL Pipeline originates, could "potentially be doing more to mitigate carbon release."

    According to Politico, Obama's remarks follow a series of comments on the accuracy of projected levels of airborne carbon that could be created by the pipeline. Speaking to Congressional Republicans, Obama said that some analyses of the project's environmental impact had been exaggerated.

    Regardless of whether the pipeline will raise existing levels of carbon, there is little doubt about the need for families to protect themselves from the harmful effects of air pollution. Investing in an IQAir GC MultiGas medical-grade air filtration system is an excellent way for concerned individuals to ensure their domestic air quality is as high as it possibly can be.

  • Obama evaluating environmental impact of Keystone pipeline

    Although the issue of creating jobs and promoting economic growth is never far from the headlines, the controversy surrounding the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline has proven particularly divisive. In his latest comments on the matter, President Barack Obama reiterated that the environmental impact of the project remains a top priority for his administration, reports The New York Times.

    The key issue at stake is the amount of carbon that will be deposited into the atmosphere if construction of the pipeline proceeds. Recognizing the fact that atmospheric carbon pollution is already a serious problem in many parts of the U.S., Obama said he would only authorize the project if the pipeline does not "significantly exacerbate" levels of carbon in the air. He added that Canada, where the Keystone XL Pipeline originates, could "potentially be doing more to mitigate carbon release."

    According to Politico, Obama's remarks follow a series of comments on the accuracy of projected levels of airborne carbon that could be created by the pipeline. Speaking to Congressional Republicans, Obama said that some analyses of the project's environmental impact had been exaggerated.

    Regardless of whether the pipeline will raise existing levels of carbon, there is little doubt about the need for families to protect themselves from the harmful effects of air pollution. Investing in an IQAir GC MultiGas medical-grade air filtration system is an excellent way for concerned individuals to ensure their domestic air quality is as high as it possibly can be.

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