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Pollution

  • New study examines link between traffic pollution and the heart

    The fact that pollution can have negative health effects is common knowledge. However, not many people are aware of just what traffic-related pollution does to the body and specifically to the heart. 

    According to the study, although a link between traffic-related air pollution and heart issues had been previously established, little research focused on the actual effects of the exposure. The recent report, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Maintenance, further examined the impact of pollution on the organ. 

    After examining nearly 4,000 participants, the study concluded that traffic pollution has a connection to changes in the mass of the heart, especially in the right ventricle. This is in addition to the already-established correlation between pollution and heart disease and heart failure. 

    Because the air pollution stemming from traffic has already proven to have a negative impact on society, individuals should be taking steps to decrease its effect. One way to do this is by investing in a professional-grade device like the IQAir GC MultiGas. This home air purifier can clear the air of many pollutants and chemicals, making for a more comfortable and healthy indoor space. 

  • New EPA rule may improve air quality

    Air quality in and around cities has been a contentious issue recently, and many organizations are taking steps to improve their emissions to reduce the harm done to the environment. Most recently, the federal government has called for a change that will require sulfur to be removed from gasoline, which in turn will cut back on pollutants and smog from vehicles. 

    According to Bloomberg, this move will enhance the air quality and allow spaces to meet new health standards. While it will be expensive to implement, the benefits may outweigh this cost, especially in areas that are in close proximity to major cities and heavily trafficked areas. 

    "There are going to be significant health benefits for New Jersey and its urban communities, which are particularly hard-hit by asthma cases," Chuck Fineberg, chairman of the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition, told NorthJersey.com. 

    Individuals do not have to wait for this rule change to go into effect to begin improving their air quality. Professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including smoke and chemicals that commonly aggravate people with respiratory issues. This one step can significantly improve the air of an indoor space. 

  • New EPA rule may improve air quality

    Air quality in and around cities has been a contentious issue recently, and many organizations are taking steps to improve their emissions to reduce the harm done to the environment. Most recently, the federal government has called for a change that will require sulfur to be removed from gasoline, which in turn will cut back on pollutants and smog from vehicles. 

    According to Bloomberg, this move will enhance the air quality and allow spaces to meet new health standards. While it will be expensive to implement, the benefits may outweigh this cost, especially in areas that are in close proximity to major cities and heavily trafficked areas. 

    "There are going to be significant health benefits for New Jersey and its urban communities, which are particularly hard-hit by asthma cases," Chuck Fineberg, chairman of the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition, told NorthJersey.com. 

    Individuals do not have to wait for this rule change to go into effect to begin improving their air quality. Professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including smoke and chemicals that commonly aggravate people with respiratory issues. This one step can significantly improve the air of an indoor space. 

  • Air pollution may lead to hypertension in pregnant women

    Air pollution can cause significant health problems, and those medical issues may only be exacerbated if the individual in question is pregnant. These women have to pay attention to a number of health risks, as new research shows that breathing polluted air may be just as harmful to women and their unborn children as cigarette smoke. 

    According to a recent study from the University of Florida, which was published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, exposure to air pollutants raises the risk of hypertension in pregnant women. In turn, this can lead to several more severe problems, such as preeclampsia. 

    "Fetal development is very sensitive to environmental factors," said Dr. Xiaohui Xu, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Florida. "This is why we wanted to do this research. Hypertension (high blood pressure), in particular, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, causing a lot of problems for the mother and fetus, including preterm delivery." 

    One proactive approach to treating air pollution is to invest in a professional-grade home air purifier, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. Capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants, including chemicals, smoke and various odors, these devices are ideal for individuals who want to enhance an indoor space. 

  • Air pollution may lead to hypertension in pregnant women

    Air pollution can cause significant health problems, and those medical issues may only be exacerbated if the individual in question is pregnant. These women have to pay attention to a number of health risks, as new research shows that breathing polluted air may be just as harmful to women and their unborn children as cigarette smoke. 

    According to a recent study from the University of Florida, which was published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, exposure to air pollutants raises the risk of hypertension in pregnant women. In turn, this can lead to several more severe problems, such as preeclampsia. 

    "Fetal development is very sensitive to environmental factors," said Dr. Xiaohui Xu, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Florida. "This is why we wanted to do this research. Hypertension (high blood pressure), in particular, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, causing a lot of problems for the mother and fetus, including preterm delivery." 

    One proactive approach to treating air pollution is to invest in a professional-grade home air purifier, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. Capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants, including chemicals, smoke and various odors, these devices are ideal for individuals who want to enhance an indoor space. 

  • Air pollution may cause neurological problems, research shows

    There are many risks associated with air pollution, but exposure to these harmful particles could be more severe than previously thought. 

    A panel at the recent American Association for the Advancement of Sciences conference discussed the concept that breathing in air pollution could lead to medical issues involving the brain. Researchers noted that constant exposure to pollution can enlarge the brain's ventricles, a condition that is commonly found in individuals with neurological disorders like autism or schizophrenia. 

    Although more research needs to be done to see if pollution could lead to these problems, people who are consistently breathing in smaller, dangerous particles could be facing significant threats to their health. 

    "The component people worry about the most are the smallest particles – the ultrafine particles," Dr. Deborah Cory-Slechta, organizer of the panel, told FoxNews.com. "And the reason is because those go all the way down into the bottom of the lung. Once they get to the bottom of the lung, they can be absorbed into the blood stream."

    Individuals who are concerned about breathing in polluted air may want to invest in a medical-grade product like the IQAir GC MultiGas. This home air purifier can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants and airborne particles that could otherwise be harmful. 

  • Air pollution may cause neurological problems, research shows

    There are many risks associated with air pollution, but exposure to these harmful particles could be more severe than previously thought. 

    A panel at the recent American Association for the Advancement of Sciences conference discussed the concept that breathing in air pollution could lead to medical issues involving the brain. Researchers noted that constant exposure to pollution can enlarge the brain's ventricles, a condition that is commonly found in individuals with neurological disorders like autism or schizophrenia. 

    Although more research needs to be done to see if pollution could lead to these problems, people who are consistently breathing in smaller, dangerous particles could be facing significant threats to their health. 

    "The component people worry about the most are the smallest particles – the ultrafine particles," Dr. Deborah Cory-Slechta, organizer of the panel, told FoxNews.com. "And the reason is because those go all the way down into the bottom of the lung. Once they get to the bottom of the lung, they can be absorbed into the blood stream."

    Individuals who are concerned about breathing in polluted air may want to invest in a medical-grade product like the IQAir GC MultiGas. This home air purifier can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants and airborne particles that could otherwise be harmful. 

  • Car idling hurts air quality

    Most people are aware that their automobiles can have an impact on air quality. Although the bulk of the harmful emissions may come from factories or manufacturing plants, a significant amount can be traced back to passenger vehicles. While some individuals have made the move to green cars to be more environmentally friendly, simply reducing the amount of idling done in a vehicle could also have positive effects. 

    It is not uncommon for drivers to allow vehicles time to warm up before hitting the road, especially in the colder months when motorists want to wait for the heat to make the car more comfortable. However, studies have shown that this practice contributes to air pollution. 

    "If you are going out, try to do all of your errands in two or three stops, then come home and turn your car off," Louis Cooper, director of environmental health for Weber-Morgan Health Department, told the Standard-Examiner. "You will help to improve the air quality." 

    Cutting back on idling is just the first step. Individuals can work to make their environments more hospitable by investing in a professional-grade home air purifier. The IQAir GC MultiGas, for example, can clear a wide variety of irritants and pollutants out of the air, creating a more comfortable indoor space. 

  • Car idling hurts air quality

    Most people are aware that their automobiles can have an impact on air quality. Although the bulk of the harmful emissions may come from factories or manufacturing plants, a significant amount can be traced back to passenger vehicles. While some individuals have made the move to green cars to be more environmentally friendly, simply reducing the amount of idling done in a vehicle could also have positive effects. 

    It is not uncommon for drivers to allow vehicles time to warm up before hitting the road, especially in the colder months when motorists want to wait for the heat to make the car more comfortable. However, studies have shown that this practice contributes to air pollution. 

    "If you are going out, try to do all of your errands in two or three stops, then come home and turn your car off," Louis Cooper, director of environmental health for Weber-Morgan Health Department, told the Standard-Examiner. "You will help to improve the air quality." 

    Cutting back on idling is just the first step. Individuals can work to make their environments more hospitable by investing in a professional-grade home air purifier. The IQAir GC MultiGas, for example, can clear a wide variety of irritants and pollutants out of the air, creating a more comfortable indoor space. 

  • Take steps to prevent air pollution-related health problems

    Recently, there have been a number of studies detailing the negative impact that air pollution can have on personal health. Problems ranging from asthma attacks to cancer may arise as a result of poor air, and working to reduce and remove these particles is one of the few ways to ensure long-term health. 

    A recent Danish study looked at the comprehensive health issues related to air pollution, and the findings show that a wide range of diseases are brought on or aggravated by low-quality air. 

    "It came as a surprise to me that the studies showed a connection between air pollution and diabetes," said Ole Hertel, a professor at Aarhus University who participated in the research. "It s rather new information that air pollution can cause diabetes, and we are working on finding a biological explanation for this correlation." 

    While widespread action is needed to curb air pollution across the globe, there are steps individuals can take to improve the quality of air in their homes. Many choose to invest in professional-grade devices like home air purifiers. With options such as the IQAir GC MultiGas capable of clearing most smoke, chemicals and pollutants, it's easy to improve any indoor space.

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