Shop With ConfidenceFresh Air News

Pollution

  • US reduces power plant pollution

    Poor air quality has sent many Americans in search of home air filters that will improve the atmosphere indoors. Whether homes are in major cities or near heavily trafficked areas, they often can benefit from professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas. Although these air purifiers may be necessary, there is some good news concerning pollution in the U.S. 

    According to data from the Environmental Protection Agency, gas pollution produced by large power plants in the U.S. has declined 10 percent since 2010. While some of that drop may be due to slightly warmer winters in the past few years, a large portion of the reduction is the result of a switch to natural gas instead of coal. 

    Not only is the production and dispersion of these harmful fumes on the decline, but the amount of carbon dioxide pollution in the air is dropping as well. These emissions fell by almost 4 percent in 2012, according to data released by the Department of Energy. 

    These changes in air quality may be good news for many Americans, but there is still much to be done. Fossil-fuel power plants still dominate the U.S. landscape and are responsible for most emissions, and that will have to be drastically reduced to improve the air for all. 

  • US reduces power plant pollution

    Poor air quality has sent many Americans in search of home air filters that will improve the atmosphere indoors. Whether homes are in major cities or near heavily trafficked areas, they often can benefit from professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas. Although these air purifiers may be necessary, there is some good news concerning pollution in the U.S. 

    According to data from the Environmental Protection Agency, gas pollution produced by large power plants in the U.S. has declined 10 percent since 2010. While some of that drop may be due to slightly warmer winters in the past few years, a large portion of the reduction is the result of a switch to natural gas instead of coal. 

    Not only is the production and dispersion of these harmful fumes on the decline, but the amount of carbon dioxide pollution in the air is dropping as well. These emissions fell by almost 4 percent in 2012, according to data released by the Department of Energy. 

    These changes in air quality may be good news for many Americans, but there is still much to be done. Fossil-fuel power plants still dominate the U.S. landscape and are responsible for most emissions, and that will have to be drastically reduced to improve the air for all. 

  • Air pollution leads to dry eyes

    Individuals living in areas with high levels of pollution may be familiar with the health risks that come about as a result of poor air quality. However, few people are as cognizant of the little annoyances that come about as a result of air pollution, which was the subject of one recent study. 

    The research, presented at the 117th Annual Meeting of the American Academy Ophthalmology, found that those who live in major cities with lots of air pollution were three to four times more likely to suffer from dry eye syndrome. Characterized by a lack of tear production, this issue could result in an irritating and potentially harmful medical problem. 

    "Undoubtedly, many people living in arid and polluted cities would readily attest to the irritating effect air pollution has on dry eye," said Dr. Anat Galor, the lead researcher on the study. "Our research suggests that simple actions, such as maintaining the appropriate humidity indoors and using a high-quality air filter, should be considered as part of the overall management of patients suffering from dry eye syndrome." 

    Home air purifiers could make a difference in patients with dry eye syndrome. Options like the IQAir GC MultiGas are medical-grade filters that can clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, which could positively affect dry eye syndrome as well as related health problems. 

  • Prenatal exposure to pollutants may cause asthma

    The effect of air pollution on unborn children is the subject of a lot of current research. One of the latest studies found that children who are exposed to chemicals while in the womb are more likely to develop asthma by the time they turn 20 years old, according to Scientific American. 

    This isn't the first research to look at the effect pollution has on unborn children. Previously, scientists at Columbia University conducted a similar study that showed pregnant women who are exposed to air pollution could be putting children at risk for anxiety or depression, Time magazine reported. 

    "Our study provides new evidence that prenatal exposures to these air pollutants, at levels commonly encountered in New York City and other urban areas, may adversely affect child behavior," said Dr. Frederica Perera, one of the Columbia researchers, as quoted by the news source. 

    To help prevent asthma and similar health problems from impacting a child's life, many adults will want to invest in medical-grade air purifiers. These devices, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas, are capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants, including second-hand smoke, cooking smells, chemicals and more. While these investments are not a guarantee that asthma won't become a problem later in life, they could provide a healthy advantage for many children. 

  • Gas stoves may impact air pollution, study shows

    Many individuals choose to invest in professional-grade air filters like the IQAir GC MultiGas to improve the air quality in their homes. The driving force behind these purchases is usually to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, but some may not be aware of where these pollutants are coming from.

    According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, those who use gas stoves may be exposed to high levels of air pollution. In fact, researchers found that as many as two-thirds of households in Southern California that use natural gas burners without the proper ventilation breathe in high levels of air pollution that exceed federal health standards. 

    The most common pollutants were nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, all of which may cause respiratory problems or similar health issues, the Los Angeles Times reported. These chemicals may even create an environment more harmful than pollutants outdoors. 

    Proper ventilation may remedy many of these problems, but older homes without a working range hood or those with other issues may see stoves impact indoor air quality. As a result, choosing a home air purifier that rids the air of pollutants like gas or cooking smells could be a smart investment for any individual.

  • Gas stoves may impact air pollution, study shows

    Many individuals choose to invest in professional-grade air filters like the IQAir GC MultiGas to improve the air quality in their homes. The driving force behind these purchases is usually to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, but some may not be aware of where these pollutants are coming from.

    According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, those who use gas stoves may be exposed to high levels of air pollution. In fact, researchers found that as many as two-thirds of households in Southern California that use natural gas burners without the proper ventilation breathe in high levels of air pollution that exceed federal health standards. 

    The most common pollutants were nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, all of which may cause respiratory problems or similar health issues, the Los Angeles Times reported. These chemicals may even create an environment more harmful than pollutants outdoors. 

    Proper ventilation may remedy many of these problems, but older homes without a working range hood or those with other issues may see stoves impact indoor air quality. As a result, choosing a home air purifier that rids the air of pollutants like gas or cooking smells could be a smart investment for any individual.

  • Transport trains may cause air pollution

    Many Americans know that with cold winter weather comes an increased use of heating methods. That means that many individuals need coal, oil and other types of fuel to keep their spaces warm, and before they can get these resources they need to wait to have fuel products shipped to a given location - a process that may hurt the environment. 

    A recent study from a research group at the University of Washington looked at how the transport of these heating materials affected the environment. They found that there is a large increase in the amount of coal dust in the air when trains pass, which leads to significant spikes in pollution in areas near train tracks. 

    One of the unique aspects of this study was that it was entirely funded by outside individuals who wanted to know the results. With hundreds of people donating more than $20,000 to the effort, it is clear that many Americans are concerned about the air quality around their homes. Some may turn to home air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas to improve the environment within a home, but that is only a small part of bettering the atmosphere. 

  • Idling vehicles contribute to air pollution

    Numerous studies have shown that people living near highways and heavily congested areas may experience the impact on air quality, but even those who live in suburbs or quieter regions need to be aware of the potential for pollution. A recent study, published in the journal Environmental Science Processes and Impacts, looked at how idling cars and school buses affected air quality around public schools in Cincinnati. 

    The research found that pollution in areas around schools may be measurably greater due to idling vehicles, and that poor air quality may have a negative impact on schoolchildren. 

    "Anti-idling campaigns are frequently attempted to improve air quality, but until now, no one has evaluated how effective they are," said Dr. Patrick Ryan, the lead author of the study. "The results of this study demonstrate, for the first time, that not idling is a simple and effective policy that can improve air quality at schools, especially schools with a large number of buses." 

    While this study focused on idling outside schools, homeowners may also be concerned about how vehicles are impacted their environment. Investing in medical-grade air filters like the IQAir GC MultiGas may help to clear the air in a home, and could provide some peace of mind for Americans regardless of where they live. 

  • California to track freeway emissions

    With so many studies releasing findings about the health impact of living near areas of heavy traffic, people across the U.S. are beginning to pay more attention to vehicle emissions. That is certainly true in Southern California, where the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is collected data regarding the air quality around freeways to measure pollution from traffic. 

    "This is a much-needed step to give us critical information to know how dirty the air is where people are breathing it," Frank O'Donnell, president of the advocacy group Clean Air Watch, told The Press-Enterprise. 

    Although California is set to track freeway emissions, there are no regulations for indoor settings. That makes it difficult for homeowners to track the air quality of their homes and make improvements that could help them breathe easier. For that reason, many people choose to invest in high-end home air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas, which is capable of clearing the air of smoke, chemicals and similar pollutants. 

    Until the day it is possible to track all vehicle emissions and indoor air quality, homeowners may have to take measures to improve the environment in their personal space, and investing in a home air filter is a solid first step. 

  • States focus on climate change, reducing pollution

    The effects of air pollution on health have been well documented, and recent reports about some of the more intense consequences have sent individuals searching for home air filters. Although investing in a medical-grade product like the IQAir GC MultiGas can get rid of many chemicals and pollutants, widespread and comprehensive actions are needed, which is why some states along the West Coast are striving for change. 

    Governors from California, Oregon and Washington recently met with the Canadian premier of British Columbia to talk about climate change and pollution. These leaders are aiming to reduce carbon pollution and greenhouse gas omissions in their respective regions while also emphasizing the adaptation of zero-emission vehicles. The hope is that these efforts will lessen the impact on the environment and improve the health of residents - a prospect that could save millions of dollars in the long run. 

    "Nearly 30,000 hospital admissions and ER visits could have been avoided over the two-year period, with resulting savings of about $193 million," the RAND Corporation reported, as quoted by The Washington Post. "Because public insurers such as Medicare and Medi-Cal paid most of the pollution health care bill, they have a lot to gain from cleaner air."  

41-50 of 302 total

  1. ...
  2. 1
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 31
  9. ...