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Pollution

  • Study finds diesel exhaust may lead to lung cancer

    Living in areas with heavy vehicle traffic can be a nuisance, but it also may have a major impact on personal health. A recent study published in Environmental Health Perspectives found that as much as 6 percent of all lung cancer deaths in the U.S. and U.K. can be attributed to diesel exhaust. 

    In 2012, the World Health Organization stated that diesel exhaust is a harmful carcinogen. However, little research had been done examining the extent of the problem. Now, scientists are aware of the far-reaching effects of the exhaust. Although regulations are getting stricter and diesel emissions are becoming cleaner, factory workers, truckers, frequent drivers and even residents are still at risk. 

    "With millions of workers currently exposed to such levels, and likely higher levels in than past, the impact on the current and future lung cancer burden could be substantial," the authors of the study wrote. 

    People living in heavily trafficked areas can be proactive about purifying the air they breathe. Professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas can be a huge help, as they clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including many chemicals and pollutants normally found in populated regions. 

  • San Francisco area faces intense air pollution

    When people think of California, images of sprawling beaches, wide-open forests and the scenic Pacific Coast Highway likely come to mind. In recent weeks, however, much of the San Francisco Bay Area has been covered by layers of smog and air pollution.

    A combination of dry weather and nearby fires creating massive amounts of smoke has caused the pollution level in San Francisco, San Jose and surrounding areas to reach nearly triple the federal health standard, the San Jose Mercury News reported. Soot, dust and other debris is stuck in the area, with no weather patterns available to clear the air. 

    "It's like living in a terrarium. There's no rain and no winds. So we aren't having the normal cleansing effect," Lisa Fasano, spokeswomen for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, told the San Jose Mercury News. 

    No matter what area of the country is being affected by air pollution, the residents can turn to medical-grade home air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas. This device is able to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, including second-hand smoke or chemicals stemming from large populations of people, manufacturing plants and heavy traffic. 

  • Eastern states are affected by Midwest pollution

    Air quality may differ by region, but a large influence on one area's pollution may be the manufacturing going on hundreds of miles away. According to The New York Times, states along the East Coast are suffering, as the wind carries polluted air from the Midwest, and to battle this problem many of the Eastern regions are planning on petitioning the Environmental Protection Agency to enforce stricter regulations. 

    The eight states, including New York, Connecticut and Maine, have historically had more rules regarding air pollution. They want the rest of the country to implement these regulations as well, as the pollution from Midwest factories, coal-powered plants and traffic are affecting quality of life across the country. 

    "Maine has more of a stake than most states with these laws because of our geography," Ed Miller, senior vice president for policy at the American Lung Association of the Northeast, told The Portland Press Herald. "And we have higher rates of lung disease, higher rates of asthma and we have a larger older population that tends to be more susceptible to air pollution." 

    While most residents will have to wait to see the outcome of these petitions, they can take steps to improve the air in their own homes. Air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas can go a long way toward making it easier to breathe indoors. 

  • Environmental factors could lead to heart defects in children

    Parents typically go above and beyond to keep their children safe, and often that extends to actions like purchasing a home air purifier. These devices, especially high-end models like the IQAir GC MultiGas, are effective at clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants and pollutants, which makes them ideal choices for people eager to breathe easier in a home. However, the benefits of these air filters may go beyond comfort, as environmental toxins can play a large role in children's health. 

    According to recent research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013, congenital heart defects are more likely to develop in children whose mothers were exposed to certain environmental toxins during pregnancy. While these defects may also be caused by genetic factors, the latest studies have shown a correlation between pollutants in the air with those toxins mostly stemming from metals and organic compounds commonly found in factory settings. 

    "Although still in the early stage, this research suggests some chemical emissions - particularly, industrial air emissions - may be linked to heart abnormalities that develop while the heart is forming in the womb," said Dr. Deliwe P. Ngwezi, one of the researchers involved with the study. 

  • Environmental factors could lead to heart defects in children

    Parents typically go above and beyond to keep their children safe, and often that extends to actions like purchasing a home air purifier. These devices, especially high-end models like the IQAir GC MultiGas, are effective at clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants and pollutants, which makes them ideal choices for people eager to breathe easier in a home. However, the benefits of these air filters may go beyond comfort, as environmental toxins can play a large role in children's health. 

    According to recent research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013, congenital heart defects are more likely to develop in children whose mothers were exposed to certain environmental toxins during pregnancy. While these defects may also be caused by genetic factors, the latest studies have shown a correlation between pollutants in the air with those toxins mostly stemming from metals and organic compounds commonly found in factory settings. 

    "Although still in the early stage, this research suggests some chemical emissions - particularly, industrial air emissions - may be linked to heart abnormalities that develop while the heart is forming in the womb," said Dr. Deliwe P. Ngwezi, one of the researchers involved with the study. 

  • Air pollution linked to autism, study shows

    There are several well-known health risks associated with air pollution, but some may go beyond allergies or respiratory issues. A recent study from researchers at the University of Southern Carolina, set to be published in the journal Epidemiology, found that exposure to air pollution increases the risk for autism among those individuals who have a genetic disposition for the disorder. 

    Although genetics are a major factor, air pollution and other environmental factors clearly play a role in the development of autism. Numerous studies have shown a relationship between air pollution and autism, and this is one of the first to focus on the instances specific to individuals with a genetic marker for the condition. 

    "Our research shows that children with both the risk genotype and exposure to high air pollutant levels were at increased risk of autism spectrum disorder compared to those without the risk genotype and lower air pollution exposure," said Dr. Heather E. Volk, the study's author, as quoted by Medical Xpress. 

    Anyone eager to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants should turn to medical-grade devices like home air purifiers. Options like the IQAir GC MultiGas are capable of eliminating chemicals and general pollution, which in turn creates a better atmosphere within a home. 

  • Upper West Side has New York's worst pollution

    Residents of New York City are used to dealing with heavy traffic, smog and even, on occasion, poor air quality. The day-to-day happenings in the city contribute to pollution, but the problems are not evenly spread across the area. In fact, there is one section of New York that is worse than others: the Upper West Side. 

    According to a report from DNA Info, the Upper West Side is the New York neighborhood with the worst air pollution. Data from NYC Clean Hit shows this district, which has a heavier population density and more large buildings than other neighborhoods, burns a large amount of heating oils that emit toxins into the environment. 

    The Upper East Side and Midtown are the areas with the next worst pollution, according to the news source. 

    Like any other major city, New York's air pollution varies from one place to another. Although some areas may be better than others, residents across the city - and any urban area - should take steps to improve the air in their homes. Home air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear the air of chemicals and irritants. 

  • Colorado tries to cut air pollution

    Colorado is known as one of the most beautiful states in the U.S., and its stunning landscape has inspired many to head outdoors to enjoy the environment. Now, state officials are implementing rules that should reduce the air pollution produced as a result of the oil and gas industry. 

    The new regulations will add monitoring systems to many energy facilities, and they will also place an emphasis on reducing methane emissions into the atmosphere. According to The Denver Post, levels of smog and other types of air pollution have been rising in Colorado since 2010, and applying these rules is the first step toward stopping and reversing the damage. 

    "These are going to amount to the very best air quality regulations in the country," said Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, as quoted by the news source. 

    It will take some time before these changes begin affecting the environment, but in the meantime, individuals can make strides toward cleaner air in their own homes. People in any state can invest in high-end air filters like the IQAir GC MultiGas, which is capable of getting rid of many common airborne irritants. 

  • US reduces power plant pollution

    Poor air quality has sent many Americans in search of home air filters that will improve the atmosphere indoors. Whether homes are in major cities or near heavily trafficked areas, they often can benefit from professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas. Although these air purifiers may be necessary, there is some good news concerning pollution in the U.S. 

    According to data from the Environmental Protection Agency, gas pollution produced by large power plants in the U.S. has declined 10 percent since 2010. While some of that drop may be due to slightly warmer winters in the past few years, a large portion of the reduction is the result of a switch to natural gas instead of coal. 

    Not only is the production and dispersion of these harmful fumes on the decline, but the amount of carbon dioxide pollution in the air is dropping as well. These emissions fell by almost 4 percent in 2012, according to data released by the Department of Energy. 

    These changes in air quality may be good news for many Americans, but there is still much to be done. Fossil-fuel power plants still dominate the U.S. landscape and are responsible for most emissions, and that will have to be drastically reduced to improve the air for all. 

  • US reduces power plant pollution

    Poor air quality has sent many Americans in search of home air filters that will improve the atmosphere indoors. Whether homes are in major cities or near heavily trafficked areas, they often can benefit from professional-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas. Although these air purifiers may be necessary, there is some good news concerning pollution in the U.S. 

    According to data from the Environmental Protection Agency, gas pollution produced by large power plants in the U.S. has declined 10 percent since 2010. While some of that drop may be due to slightly warmer winters in the past few years, a large portion of the reduction is the result of a switch to natural gas instead of coal. 

    Not only is the production and dispersion of these harmful fumes on the decline, but the amount of carbon dioxide pollution in the air is dropping as well. These emissions fell by almost 4 percent in 2012, according to data released by the Department of Energy. 

    These changes in air quality may be good news for many Americans, but there is still much to be done. Fossil-fuel power plants still dominate the U.S. landscape and are responsible for most emissions, and that will have to be drastically reduced to improve the air for all. 

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