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Pollution

  • Clean air and the economy

    Deciding on a way to reduce pollution levels has been a major debate between those who take great stock in the environment and those who hold stock. The economic implications of reducing air pollution and tightening air laws has always been one of the main reasons not to make huge changes all at once.

    Now, with the recently proposed tightening of restrictions, one of the major arguments against the change is that the cost of implementing such a thing is a poor decision, especially in the face of the recession.

    Now, however, according to statistics by the EPA, many of those claims regarding the economic instability these changes would cause are shortsighted and ultimately incorrect. Within four years, the cross-state air pollution rules are projected to avoid nearly 34,000 deaths and could save $120 billion in healthcare costs, which would more than offset the projected $800 million cost of implementing the rule.

    Still, the debate continues, as those concerned for the environment butt heads with those concerned for the economy. If you, like many, feel like you want cleaner air sooner than the debates will allow, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier to remove the majority of toxins from the air in your home, office or recreational space.

  • Electricity and clean air

    While there has been much debate over the newly proposed changes to the regulation of pollution, energy consumption may no longer be part of the argument. When the proposals were first put forth, many opponents of the changes cited concerns that further reducing the allowable pollution would not only hurt the economy, but also cause problems with energy consumption.

    This defense against the proposed tightening regulations was based on the idea that the machines and materials needed to implement the change would be almost useless because the increased energy consumption would be worse in the long run than putting off pollution reduction.

    The North American Electric Reliability Corporation study shows that the technologies already exist to create a manageable solution to this objection. This NERC announcement has taken away one of the main arguments standing in the way of clean air reform.

    Still, there is much debate and the proposed changes aren't likely to take effect immediately. If you're concerned about the health of your family, invest in a medical-grade air purifier. They can remove up to 99.5 percent of airborne toxins, and keep those breathing inside your home as healthy as possible.

  • Pollution can worsen breathing problems

    Bronchitis is an issue in which the passage to the lungs becomes inflamed and tight, allowing less air than usual to pass through. This breathing issue isn't fun for anyone, though there are treatments. Still, it can be especially difficult for young sufferers.

    A recent international study seems to show that the excessive presence of nitrogen oxides in the air due to air pollution has made young children more susceptible to bronchitis. Lower respiratory problems have been held accountable for nearly 20 percent of the deaths in those less than 5 years old.

    This study goes on to show that the current accepted level of nitrogen oxide that's considered safe may not be so for those with developing respiratory systems. The nine-year study showed that the level of pollution may end up increasing young children's chance and frequency of developing acute bronchitis.

    If you have children and wish to protect your family from these harmful toxins in the air, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier. The models we sell at FreshAirPro can remove up to 99.5 percent of airborne pollutants that pose a risk to your family.

  • Fight indoor air pollution with a medical-grade air purifier

    It's difficult to argue with the idea that pollution is harmful to both the environment and the people who live in it. In places with high smog levels, citizens are often encouraged to stay indoors and seal their homes up as best they can to reduce their intake of pollutants. Once inside, however, there are a number of indoor pollutants that can cause mild discomfort or severe illness.

    Indoor pollutants are often a result of the fact that, while mild airborne particles are easily dissipated outside, pollutants are much more difficult to disperse inside the sealed-up interior of a home.

    Some of the more obvious sources of these toxins are heating technologies, such as escaped gas, smoke from a wood-burning stove and improperly ventilated fireplaces. Other sources can come from more hard-to-control areas.

    Mold spores from unseen areas inside the walls can cause problems, as can certain kinds of insulation like asbestos, fumes from cleaning products, rotting wood furniture and leftover tobacco smoke from any indoor smokers.

    Combat these indoor pollutants with a medical-grade air purifier like those we sell at FreshAirPro. These purifiers can help eliminate up to 99.5 percent of airborne pollutants and other irritants, keeping those in your home safe from these toxins.

  • Government reaction to smog proposal is surprising

    The last time smog limits were set was during the presidency of George W. Bush, and even at the time, environmental advocates claimed that the smog limit level was too high. In response to that, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed dropping the restriction from 70 parts per billion of smog to 65 parts per billion.

    The small difference was estimated to possibly prevent up to 7,200 deaths, 11,000 hospital visits and 38,000 cases of severe asthma per year. Opponents to the proposal immediately argued the timing of the bill, claiming it would cost nearly $90 billion to enact the law, something that couldn't be afforded in the recession.

    President Obama rejected the proposal to the surprise of members of the EPA, saying that if he remains in office he'd be happy to look back into the request as early as 2013, but that the timing for such a drastic change would cost too much at the moment.

    During the wait to see if restrictions do indeed get tighter on smog emissions, you can still protect the health of your family by investing in a medical-grade air purifier like those we sell at FreshAirPro to reduce the level of pollutants in your home. These purifiers can help eliminate the vast majority of airborne pollutants and other irritants.

  • Aromatherapy products are linked to indoor air pollution

    While everyone knows that it's important to take time to relax now and again, a new finding suggests that doing so may be toxic if you're using aromatherapy products that contain artificial fragrances or essential oils, according to the Environmental Engineering Science journal.

    Apparently, these fragrances release Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) into the air, which cause increased levels of air pollution indoors. These VOCs react with compounds in the ozone that cause them to break down and release ultrafine byproducts called Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOAs). These SOAs can directly lead to eye and throat irritation and may cause further damage.

    If you love using aromatherapy as a means to relax at the end of a long day, you don't necessarily have to give it up. By taking a few precautionary measures, you can ensure that the air inside your home is fresh, clean and safe for you and your family.

    First, when burning aromatherapy products such as candles and incense, make sure there is enough ventilation available. This will help the toxic particles disperse.

    In addition, to ensure that the air within your home is safe from VOCs and other airborne toxins, you should invest in a medical-grade home air purifier. High-quality air purifiers can help remove up to 99.5 percent of the indoor air pollutants in your home.

  • Non-profits band together to fight air pollution

    After recent reports regarding the decline of air quality across the world, several non-profit organizations have banded together to help reduce air pollution, reports the Huffington Post. While most of the efforts are centered around developing nations, where the problem is most visible, other efforts include educating individuals all over the world about the health hazards of air pollution and how these risks can be reduced.

    Indoor air pollution is among the top health hazards in the developing world, but it is still a concern in countries such as the United States. While much of the indoor pollution is caused by open-fire cookstoves in developing nations, many households in the U.S. and other countries still use wood fires as one of their main sources of heat in the wintertime, which can produce similar results, especially in older houses, where the ventillation systems might be outdated.

    "This is a large issue, and it remains mostly under the radar," said Neil Bellefeuille, a member of Nakamura's CGI panel, whose company sells clean cook stoves. "It's literally like having a campfire in the living room."

    If your home is vulnerable to the effects of indoor air pollution from wood stoves, traffic emissions or other sources, be proactive about protecting your family's health. Investing in a home air purifier is one of the best ways to ensure that the air within your home is clean and free from serious risk.

  • Indoor air pollution from cooking equipment a big health risk

    The United Nations (UN) has estimated that approximately 1.7 million premature deaths occur each year as the result of indoor air pollution caused by inefficient cookstoves, reports The New York Times. These emissions are also the leading cause of death in children under 5 years old.

    Most of the deaths occur in developing nations, where people still rely on primitive stoves and even open-wood fires for the majority of their cooking. However, the UN estimates that this practice affects people all over the globe by causing almost 20 percent of global greenhouse emissions, according to the news source.

    Every household should make sure that their current stoves comply with the latest safety regulations in order to ensure that their homes are safe, especially if the stove is an older model. Another idea families should consider to protect their home is investing in a home air purifier. Air purifiers like those we offer from the IQAir HealthPro Series help filter dangerous emissions from the air inside your home and can remove over 99 percent of other airborne contaminants, such as mold, pollen, pet dander and viruses.

  • Air pollution is linked to premature births in some

    There are a number of health hazards that are particular to pregnant women, but a new study from the UCLA School of Public Health has added one more to the list: the air you breathe. The study, which looked at 100,000 births in the Los Angeles area, found that women who are exposed to traffic-related air pollution have a 30 percent higher chance of experiencing pre-term births, reports ABC News.

    The chemical researchers believe is most actively responsible for these staggering rates is polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Traffic has been identified as a leading cause of PAH outdoors, however findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that PAH levels can be between two and five times greater indoors than they are outdoors.

    Of course, pregnant women should be concerned about the quality of the air wherever they are. However, ensuring a safe home haven is of the utmost importance. Expecting families may want to consider investing in a home air purifier. Professional-grade air purifiers help to filter out over 99 percent of the toxins and common irritants found in indoor air and can help ensure that your home is a safe environment for both you and your new arrival.

  • Protect your home from one of the top 5 environmental hazards

    Indoor air pollution is among the top five environmental health risks, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and it's one that everyone encounters.

    Adverse health effects can begin after a single exposure to common air pollutants, such as those found in paint and new carpeting, and may include side effects like coughing, wheezing, throat and nose irritation, watery eyes and more. Repeated exposure can lead to chronic fatigue or dizziness and other, more serious complications. Serious health risks associated with indoor air pollution include allergies, asthma, heart and respiratory disease, premature births, some cancers and many other conditions.

    In many cases, exposure symptoms are short-term and can be treated effectively by removing the source of the pollutants. However, in many cases, it simply is not possible to remove all airborne contaminants.

    The best way to control the risks associated with this hazard is by eliminating the source of the pollutants and maintaining a well-ventilated home that circulates fresh outdoor air. Unfortunately, most people live in areas where the air outdoors might not be much fresher than what's already circulated inside their homes. In these cases, the EPA suggests the use of an air-cleaning device, such as a home air purifier.

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