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Pollution

  • Summer smog detracts from the nation?s greatest natural treasures

    The summer haze is getting thick enough to obscure the view of the United State’s greatest natural treasures. Millions of Americans travel to the nation’s parks to see the sights. In fact, over nine million people will visit the Great Smokey Mountains in 2012 if yearly indicators are correct, The New York Times reports. However, many people may be unable to see a clear picture of the rolling mountainsides due to smog created from modern industry.

    The Clean Air Act and other legislation is attempting to reduce the presence of harmful toxins in the air to improve the health of Americans and allow the nation’s greatest treasures to remain safe and visible.

    According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Air Act Amendments will prevent the early death of over 230,000 Americans in 2020. While legislation is helping to improve air quality outdoors, consider investing in a home air purifier to reduce the presence of fine particulate matter indoors. IQAir HealthPro Plus HEPA Air Purifiers can drastically improve air quality in a home.

  • New study finds smoking increases pollution

    A new medical study by Otago University researchers in Wellington, New Zealand has found that cigarettes significantly increase air pollution. The study lasted five weeks and measured fine particulate matter linked to heart disease, decreased lung function and lung cancer, reports the New Zealand Herald.

    Air quality tests were conducted around 284 smokers at a shopping center at an average distance of about 8.5 feet. According to the research, air quality at that distance featured 70 percent more fine particles than areas with no smokers around. The mean pollution level measured near a smoker standing at a bus stop was 16 times higher than when there were no smokers present.

    ''[Smoking is] adding to air pollution. People are being exposed to this all the time, as well as industry pollution and home fires," said associate professor Nick Wilson, according to the news source.

    Homeowners living with a smoker or near neighbors that consume cigarettes can invest in a home air purifier to reduce the presence of harmful toxins.

  • Wisconsin improves air quality standards

    Wisconsin may seldom be mentioned when it comes to air pollution standards, but the state has recently been taking strides to reduce the production of harmful pollutants by factories and other industrial companies. Environmental Protection reported the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice reached a settlement with Dairyland Power Cooperative (DPC) that will blanket power plants in Alma and Genoa, Wisconsin. The DPC will spend $150 million to improve pollution control technology.

    "This settlement will improve air quality in Wisconsin and downwind areas by significantly reducing releases of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and other harmful pollutants," said Ignacia S. Moreno, assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the Department of Justice.

    The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin is expected to approve the settlement after a 30-day period. However, pollutants will still be leaked in some quantities, and even the strictest safety standards may not be able to prevent the release of harmful toxins. Those facing the risk of exposure to these and other harmful chemicals can invest in the IQAir GC MultiGas home air purifier. This device filters out everything from smog particles to allergens, and ensures the good health of any home occupant.

  • Code red air quality in Atlanta

    Health officials from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Environmental Protection Division have issued a code red air quality alert for Atlanta for June 29, 2012. The record high temperatures, stagnant wind and increased levels of humidity will create unhealthy smog levels in the surrounding metro area.

    A code red signifies that everyone is at risk for respiratory problems due to the poor air quality. However, groups such as children, the elderly and those afflicted with asthma or other respiratory issues are particularly at risk.

    Homeowners concerned about the negative impacts of poor air quality can invest in a home air purifier. Implementing the use of technology such as IQAir HealthPro Plus HEPA Air Purifiers can greatly reduce a person’s exposure to toxins and respiratory aggravators.

    Even on days labeled as unhealthy due to the combination of air pollutions and environmental factors, a homeowner can stay safe in their house with a home air purifier.

    The climate is not going to change in Atlanta, so make sure the right technology is taking care of you and your loved ones.

  • Renters concerned about home air quality

    According to a new survey conducted by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, apartment dwellers are more concerned about their air quality than homeowners. A mix of 1,000 home owners and renters were surveyed, and the results showed 16 percent more renter respondents seriously fear health threats posed by poor indoor air quality. 

    "It's possible that because some renters live very close to their neighbors, they worry not only about themselves but also what their neighbors are doing that might impact their safety," said Elissa Schuler-Adair, Ph.D., a manager of survey research at the Consumer Reports National Research Center. "Over 40 percent of renters said they were very concerned about exposure to indoor air pollutants from neighboring dwellings."

    Renters concerned about indoor air quality can invest in a home air purifier to reduce the presence of toxins. Dandruff, smoke and allergens created by previous tenants are often undetectable. However, the effects can be pronounced. Asthma and allergies are easily aggravated by the negative influence of these toxins.

    The IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier can promote health for renters and homeowners.

  • Department of Environmental Protection announces air quality warning for all five Pennsylvania regions

    The Department of Environmental Protection and regional air quality entities forecast poor air quality for June 20, 2012 across Pennsylvania. Included in the warning are all five state regions: Lehigh Valley, Pittsburgh, Liberty-Clairton, Philadelphia and Susquehanna Valley.

    Air quality for the day was predicted to reach code Orange levels, which represents unhealthy pollution concentrations. As such, the 24-hour period was labeled as an air quality action day to warn state residents. Locals considered at high risk and vulnerable to the effects of air pollution should limit time spent outside until the warning is lifted. This groups include children, seniors and those afflicted with respiratory problems like asthma and bronchitis,

    As summer continues and temperatures rise, the number of days reaching unhealthy levels of air pollution may increase. Ground-level ozone comprised of smog and fine particulate matter forms frequently in warm weather.

    Homeowners living near traffic areas can invest in a home air purifier such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier to reduce their risk of breathing in unhealthy pollutants.

  • New EPA laws target soot production

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed new air pollution regulations to increase the standards of fine particulate matter or soot. Released on June 15, 2012, the rules are a response to the legal action taken by 11 states and non-governmental organizations to increase air quality standards.

    Supporters of the action declare the proposed regulations will improve public health. Consequently, those opposed claim tightened standards will undermine industry and harm the economy.

    "To protect public health, we have to strengthen the annual standard for fine particles," said Gina McCarthy, EPA assistant administrator for air and radiation, according to Bloomberg Businessweek. "Particulate matter is a serious pollutant."

    The new standard would decrease the annual acceptance measurement of soot or fine particulate matter from 15 micrograms per cubic meter to 12 and 13 micrograms. However, a final decision on the matter will not be issued until December 14, 2012.

    While politicians debate the implementation of the standards, homeowners are still breathing unhealthy levels of air pollution. The average person can help protect a residence by investing in a home air purifier. The medical-grade IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier limits toxins present in the home and promotes positive health.

  • EPA air pollution rules face potential repeal

    A controversial air pollution rule designed to limit heavy metal pollutants such as mercury and arsenic released by power plants faces potential repeal. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) passed the Mercury and Air Toxins Standards (MATS) last year. Now, 30 senators referred to as the "Dirty 30" have joined forces to repeal the MATS on the basis that the regulation harms local industry.

    The backing of so many senators is important because, under the Congressional Review Act (CRA), an in committee vote does not require 30 senators to support it. The Senate is scheduled to vote in the next two weeks, WPRI-12 reports.

    Supporters of MATS declare the regulation was put in place to protect the American public from harmful pollutants.

    "The science is clear, and overwhelming evidence shows that particle pollution at levels currently labeled as officially 'safe' causes heart attacks, strokes and asthma attacks," said Dr. Albert Rizzo, chairman of the board of the American Lung Association, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

    Homeowners concerned about the negative health effects of air pollution can invest in a home air purifier. Whether the repeal of the MAT passes or not, selecting a high-end unit such as the IQAir GC MultiGas can reduce a person’s risk of heart attack or stroke caused by environmental influences.

  • "My Air, My Health Challenge" hopes to tap American ingenuity

    Men, women and children may soon be able to make smart decisions about the air they breathe. A new initiative supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Department of Health and Human Services is challenging inventors to develop personal, portable air quality sensors to measure an individual’s physiological response to pollution levels.

    "This challenge provides an opportunity to tap into the ingenuity of Americans to build technology to improve health. In the future, these types of personalized devices will enable people to make better informed choices about their own health and their environment," said Glenn Paulson, EPA Science Advisor.

    Researchers hope to gain data on the body’s reaction to pollution levels. Poor air quality has been linked to an increased risk of stroke, heart attack or some forms of cancer. Technological advances such as a home air purifier or this personal sensor can promote good health. Homeowners concerned about the negative impact poor air quality can have on their health can invest in IQAir HealthPro Plus HEPA Air Purifiers to reduce the presence of toxins.

  • Houston fails to make the mark, again

    The greater Houston area failed to meet federal air quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), again. The city first fell short by missing a November 2007 deadline to meet a one-hour ozone standard.

    Houston, Galveston and Brazoria counties have once again not met the mark by 1 part per billion (PPB). The goal was 124 PPB or less ozone emissions measured during one hour. However, meeting the EPA’s air quality standard was problematic for the city due to the high number of large refineries and chemical plants in the area.

    The EPA will soon craft a strategic plan of action to reduce pollution levels in the aforementioned counties. Local residents concerned about the negative health effects of poor air quality can invest in a home air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas.

    Reducing a family’s exposure to toxic chemicals and fine particulate matter can limit the risk of developing an illness or aggravating pre-existing conditions. Keep your home safe by supporting cleaner indoor air conditions.

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