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Pollution

  • Florida takes the number 6 spot in Toxic Air Top 20 list

    A recent report from the Natural Resources Defense Council listed Florida as the sixth-worst state in the nation for toxic air pollution, the Gasparilla Gazette reports. The state's electric sector ranked number six in industrial toxic air pollution in 2010, emitting approximately 16.7 million pounds of harmful chemicals into the air. This made up about 57 percent of Florida's overall state pollution level and 5 percent of all toxic pollution from U.S. industrial power plants.

    Despite the poor ranking, the state has seen air quality improvements between 2009 and 2010. For example, there has been a 4 percent drop in mercury pollution levels.

    "Toxic pollution is already being reduced as a result of EPA's health-protecting standards," John Walke, NRDC clean air director, told the news source. "Thanks to the agency's latest safeguards, millions of children and their families in the states hardest hit by toxic air pollution from power plants will be able to breathe easier.''

    Homeowners concerned about the health effects of poor air quality can invest in a home air purifier. A unit such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier can drastically reduce indoor toxin levels and promote a healthy lifestyle.

  • Air quality levels impact children's safety

    The physical environment children live in can have a significant impact on their health. Exposure to outdoor and indoor air pollutants such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and fine particulate matter can cause respiratory illnesses like asthma, according to the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.

    The source claims that in 2010, 67 percent of children  up to a maximum age of 17 years old lived in counties with air pollution levels above one or more current air quality standards set by the federal or state government. This is up from 59 percent in 2009 but down from the 77 percent recorded in 2003.

    A high concentration of air pollutants in a home can lead to physical and developmental problems in children that can affect them for the rest of their lives. Parents concerned about the impact of low air quality can invest in an IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier. The medical-grade unit is an efficient addition to any home and can improve the health and wellbeing of any child at any age.

  • Alaskan voters to decide air pollution issue

    Soon, Alaskan voters in Fairbanks will have the opportunity to decide whether air pollution should be regulated in the region, the Daily News Miner reports. A local group is opposed to the idea of setting a new standard that would require all new heating stoves to feature clean-burning designs. In addition, the proposal prohibits the burning of chemically treated wood, railroad ties, garbage and various other unapproved fuel sources.

    Named the Home Heating Initiative, the bill will be placed on the October ballot, and residents will vote whether or not to approve the standard.  This recent initiative goes beyond current state and federal requirements, and as such, not all politicians happy.

    "The administration failed to enact the full scope of intent of the last initiative. This language should make their deliberation process quite easy. The bottom line is the borough should not take on duties already handled by the state Department of Environmental Conservation," Representative Tammie Wilson told the news source. "A new layer of bureaucracy is unnecessary; the state has the mandate and the resources to address air quality."

    Regardless of whether the initiative passes or not, property owners in the area can invest in medical-grade home air purifiers to ensure the indoor air they are breathing is safe and clean. The IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier can remove fine particulate matter from the air for a better respiration.

  • U.S. Senator asks EPA to reject new particulate standards

    U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe asked the Environmental Protection Agency to reject a court settlement that passed and required the EPA to set new particulate matter standards that are due by December 14, 2012, Tulsa World reports. The original settlement was between a coalition of 11 states, who pursued a lawsuit against the agency for failing to place new air quality standards.

    The senator asked the administration to delay decision-making until one year after the EPA inspector general’s office completes an ongoing investigation on what he referred to as "alarming evidence of EPA abuse of scientific information and mismanagement of its Clear Air Act Scientific Advisory Committee," according to the news source.

    "The proposed settlement provides ammunition to EPA critics who charge that the agency manipulates regulatory litigation to thwart public comment and interagency review," Inhofe wrote.

    As the air quality standards continue to remain under debate, homeowners can protect themselves and their loved ones by investing in a medical-grade home air purifier. A unit such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier can reduce the presence of indoor air pollutants.

  • Washington-backed air pollution plan proposed to slow climate change

    A Washington-led plan to cut soot and other air pollution has gained the support of seven other nations. According to senior U.S. officials, the effort is being made to "buy time" and develop a solution to the world’s growing pollution problem, Reuters reports.

    Seven countries have formally backed the plan - Britain, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy and Jordan. The U.S.-led Climate and Clean Air Initiative has increased membership since the plan was initiated in February 2012.

    "If we are able to do this we could really buy time in the context of the global problem to combat climate change," said Jonathan Pershing, U.S. deputy special envoy for climate change, according to the news source.

    As global warming continues to worry world leaders, strategies are being crafted to reduce soot pollution, heat-trapping methane, ground level ozone and HFC gases. These and other common toxins have a direct impact on air quality in a region. According to the experts, air pollution may be responsible for about six million deaths a year.

    Homeowners concerned about the impact of air pollution on their direct health can invest in IQAir HealthPro Plus HEPA Air Purifiers. The medical-grade machines can reduce the presence of common toxins indoors and help keep residents happy and healthy.

  • Company fined for failing to meet air quality standards

    State and federal agencies are serious about curbing air pollution levels across the United States. Chevron USA Inc. will pay a civil penalty of $231,875 following a settlement over the organization’s alleged violations of air pollution laws, Legal Newsline reports.

    The Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Protection Agency filed complaints against the business that claimed the Perth Amboy asphalt refinery violated state and federal air quality standards. The fine may be all that is needed to ensure the corporation invests in the new technology required to reduce pollution output.

    "We are committed to working with DEP to ensure compliance with New Jersey's air quality and other pollution control laws," Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa said in a statement, according to the news source. "This collaborative effort is critical to protecting our environment and preserving the quality of life of New Jersey residents."

    Homeowners in the vicinity of plants can invest in a home air purifier to reduce the presence of particulate matter indoors. IQAir HealthPro Plus HEPA Air Purifiers can improve the air quality within a home, which will support a more healthy lifestyle for everyone in the family.

  • Summer's poor air quality may impact the health of many Americans

    The oppressive heat wave cascading across the United States has impacted everything from agriculture to community pools. While these sectors are important, understanding how high temperatures are affecting air quality is also vital.

    Many counties across the nation are warning residents of poor air quality as a result of high ozone levels. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, high ozone levels can cause respiratory issues such as coughing, throat irritation, pain, burning, chest discomfort when breathing, shortness of breath and wheezing.

    "[Ozone] hurts not just people and their lungs but it can damage buildings and plants, just about anything it comes into contact with for a long period of time," Environmental Health and Lab Manager Jim Steinhoff told WXOW News 19.

    Homeowners concerned about the impact of high ozone can invest in a home air purifier. Medical-grade units such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier improves indoor air quality by removing fine particulate matter and pollutants that remain close to the ground when heat levels are high.

  • Orlando electric utility upgrade suspended

    Upgrades to the government-owned electric utility company in Orlando have been suspended. For the past few years, officials crafted plans to spend approximately $100 million to improve the efficiency of the plant, however, court battles and uncertain federal legislation have delayed the project, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

    Without clear and definable standards, the Orlando Utilities Commission is wary of starting the process of upgrading the power plant. While officials wish to reduce pollution, stating the improvements could improve air quality all the way to Texas, unexpected costs accruing from new standards could harm the success of the project, according to the news source. As a result, the improvements to the plant are on hold until federal standards are clearly defined and settled on.

    "It's astonishing to people sometimes how far pollution can blow," Janice Nolen, the association's assistant vice president of national policy and advocacy, told the news source. "No matter how much some states want to clean up their air, and a lot of states do, they can't because of the pollution coming across their line. This really is a problem that needs to be addressed with a cross-state rule."

    Air pollution is not an issue that impacts just one region. The negative health effects associated with fine particulate matter produced by plants can stretch out across the country. Consequently, homeowners concerned about air quality can invest in the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier.

  • Summer smog detracts from the nation?s greatest natural treasures

    The summer haze is getting thick enough to obscure the view of the United State’s greatest natural treasures. Millions of Americans travel to the nation’s parks to see the sights. In fact, over nine million people will visit the Great Smokey Mountains in 2012 if yearly indicators are correct, The New York Times reports. However, many people may be unable to see a clear picture of the rolling mountainsides due to smog created from modern industry.

    The Clean Air Act and other legislation is attempting to reduce the presence of harmful toxins in the air to improve the health of Americans and allow the nation’s greatest treasures to remain safe and visible.

    According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Air Act Amendments will prevent the early death of over 230,000 Americans in 2020. While legislation is helping to improve air quality outdoors, consider investing in a home air purifier to reduce the presence of fine particulate matter indoors. IQAir HealthPro Plus HEPA Air Purifiers can drastically improve air quality in a home.

  • New study finds smoking increases pollution

    A new medical study by Otago University researchers in Wellington, New Zealand has found that cigarettes significantly increase air pollution. The study lasted five weeks and measured fine particulate matter linked to heart disease, decreased lung function and lung cancer, reports the New Zealand Herald.

    Air quality tests were conducted around 284 smokers at a shopping center at an average distance of about 8.5 feet. According to the research, air quality at that distance featured 70 percent more fine particles than areas with no smokers around. The mean pollution level measured near a smoker standing at a bus stop was 16 times higher than when there were no smokers present.

    ''[Smoking is] adding to air pollution. People are being exposed to this all the time, as well as industry pollution and home fires," said associate professor Nick Wilson, according to the news source.

    Homeowners living with a smoker or near neighbors that consume cigarettes can invest in a home air purifier to reduce the presence of harmful toxins.

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