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Clean Air

  • New EPA rules will likely shut down coal plants by 2014

    The Environmental Protection Agency's new changes to the Clean Air Act are likely to have the extra effect of causing some older coal-burning power plants to shut down. These plants, nearly all of which are over 50 years old, have been kept running due to loopholes in the Clean Air Act that allowed plants built before a certain time to continue running without restrictions.

    This loophole was intended to allow plants on the verge of closing a few final years before shutting down, but many of them still run, without any air filters or environmental restrictions. The EPA's new restrictions will affect many of those plants, however, and cause the majority of them to shut down.

    Opponents of the changes argue that the loss of jobs and energy this shutdown will cause is inexcusable, while those supporting the revisions tout statistics about how much cleaner the air would be without these high-pollution locations.

    Either way, the shut downs will likely not go into effect until 2014, meaning that, for the time being, pollution will continue to to accumulate. If you want to keep these airborne toxins from your home, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier. The powerful filtering technology will keep the air in your home safe for you and your family.

  • Clean Air Act violation results in $12 million fine

    The Clean Air Act is a piece of legislation that is designed to improve the health of every American citizen through regulation of pollution and strict attention to air quality. Pelican Refining Company LLC, a Texas-based oil company operating in Louisiana, was found to be in violation of the Act and received its sentencing this month - a fine of $12 million for purposely causing the violations and attempting to cover up its wrongdoing.

    The cost, a $10 million fine for criminal wrongdoing and an additional $2 million to be spent on community service-based environmental improvements, is the largest of its kind in Louisiana and is a good reminder that though much progress has been made in keeping the air clean and healthy, there is always room for improvement.

    While the majority of companies take steps to comply with regulations, the upcoming tightening restrictions on the Clean Air Act may reveal that companies that value profits over public safety will do everything they can to avoid reducing their emissions at the expense of their bottom line.

    Rather than waiting for those corporations to fall in line, protect your family from harmful pollutants now by investing in a medical-grade air purifier to keep the air in your home fresh and healthy.

  • Punjab Agricultural University is one escape from city pollution

    Pollution in India has been a problem ever since the country went through a major industrial revolution following its independence from Britain. Cities like Ludhiana in Punjab have gotten so bad in this regard that the majority of flights from the area are unable to take off for days at a time. Recently, a group of international beauty queens visited the city, and the common complaint about the city was the state of the air.

    Punjab Agricultural University is located a few miles away from the city proper and has recently become an extremely popular place for walking as a result of the city's high pollution. It has become so popular, in fact, that the university began requiring permits from those on the campus. Still, despite the permit fee, many city dwellers are paying it happily and travel for miles for the opportunity to take a walk and clear their lungs of the dirty city air.

    This clamor for clean air is a strong indicator of the difference it makes not only to one's energy, but also health. If you want to make a similar stand for your health and energy level, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier and fill your home with clean, fresh air.

  • EPA's clean air restrictions gain backing in the days before the final version is released

    This is a big week for the Environmental Protection Agency, as Friday is the day it releases its final version of the controversial extension to the historic Clean Air Act.

    There has been much debate over these changes, with opponents of the change arguing that the effect the new laws will have on the economy would be disastrous when piled on to the already shaky financial foothold the nation has found. Supporters argue that the amount saved in the long run will more than outweigh any temporary drops, as the resulting increase in human life and health will severely reduce medical expenses while improving the environment greatly.

    The bill's detractors claim that the changes will also affect energy-producing factories and severely affect the national power grid. The EPA responds with claims that the majority of current energy-production facilities will have no problem coping with the changes, and the ones that might have an issue will be inspired to put more effort into researching and implementing cleaner energy to keep business going.

    While the debate rages on, the air near your home may remain full of toxins. To combat this, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier to keep your home clean and healthy.

  • Tempe leads the area in clean air technology

    Tempe is a city in Arizona that borders the state capitol of Phoenix, and it has put a lot of effort into keeping its air as clean as possible for its citizens. During the 24th annual Clean Air Campaign luncheon, Tempe was awarded for the efforts it has made to keep pollution and emissions down.

    Tempe was especially recognized for its attempt at making transportation as green as possible. One of the ways the city has accomplished this is by encouraging and celebrating bikers rather than drivers. The Tour de Tempe is an annual free 10-mile bike race that is meant to show bicyclists the many bike paths and routes residents can regularly enjoy.

    The city also sponsors a 'ride your bike to work day' that includes various restaurants and event locations that have giveaways and free meals for participants. City employees are required to use public transportation where possible, and Tempe spends part of its transportation budget just buying passes for these employees. The city even plays host to a fleet of carbon-neutral taxis.

    Though there are many efforts to make air clean all over the country, there is always more to do. To keep your home cleaner, consider investing in a medical-grade home air purifier to keep your family safe and healthy all year long.

  • Kansas and other states to benefit from upcoming clean air rules

    The debate over the details of the Clean Air Act rages on in the political arenas of the country, but one rule change that was finalized recently aims to protect states from being polluted by their neighbors.

    The Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) will have states that create the majority of pollution in the country tighten their air quality standards to prevent neighboring states from being negatively effected by the emissions. This rule applies heavily to those states with a high number of coal-based power plants, and was one of the points of contention between those who claim changing air regulations will hurt the economy and those who are backing the laws.

    One way to help understand the rule is to look at it as if it's a large-scale version of many of the smoking laws passed in the past few years. The CSAPR is an attempt to keep some states from hurting others with their large-scale secondhand smoke.

    This new law doesn't go into effect until 2012, so if you want to improve the quality of air you breathe now, invest in an air purifier to leave your home or office full of fresh, clean air.

  • Austin continues the battle against secondhand smoke

    Over the past few years, smoking has become more and more of a hot button issue. The debate between smokers and non-smokers mostly consists of a back and forth over rights, and bans on smoking are only growing stricter.

    Austin is one city that has decided to move forward with its attempt to protect citizens from unwanted secondhand smoke. Of course, arguments have arisen, with smokers claiming they don't deserve to be treated like second-class citizens because of their addiction and everyone else rebutting that secondhand smoke is a danger to everyone, and therefore must be controlled as much as possible.

    Among other changes, Austin has instituted bans within 15 feet of public areas, including bus stops and parks. Austin Community College has taken it a step further in an attempt to become a completely smoke-free campus.

    The dangers of secondhand smoking have been researched and are proven to be quite severe. If you want to protect yourself or your family from secondhand smoke, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier. With this powerful air-cleaning technology, you can remove up to 99.5 percent of toxins from the air in your home.

  • Clean air fairs celebrate healthy air

    As science advances and the information it uncovers becomes more readily available and understandable, many individuals are paying increasing attention to the planet's environment. "Environmentally friendly" has become a rallying cry that very few people disagree with. Air pollution is one of the many issues that people are beginning to take more seriously.

    As a result, or perhaps a reflection of the current state of mind that many Americans share, fairs and celebrations promoting clean air have begun sprouting up all over the country. The goals of these fairs can range from building awareness to lobbying for change, and everything in between - often all at once.

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District is holding a fair aimed at seniors in Indio, California, to promote clean air tactics. The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission has held a Clean Air Fair for the past seven years to promote green, pollution-reducing technology, encourage commuters to practice less driving and more cycling and take more steps to improve their health through the use of both commercial and home air purifiers.

    Clean air has become very important to many people, and that number grows every year. The awareness that these fairs inspire is a big step toward change.

  • Clean air and the economy

    Deciding on a way to reduce pollution levels has been a major debate between those who take great stock in the environment and those who hold stock. The economic implications of reducing air pollution and tightening air laws has always been one of the main reasons not to make huge changes all at once.

    Now, with the recently proposed tightening of restrictions, one of the major arguments against the change is that the cost of implementing such a thing is a poor decision, especially in the face of the recession.

    Now, however, according to statistics by the EPA, many of those claims regarding the economic instability these changes would cause are shortsighted and ultimately incorrect. Within four years, the cross-state air pollution rules are projected to avoid nearly 34,000 deaths and could save $120 billion in healthcare costs, which would more than offset the projected $800 million cost of implementing the rule.

    Still, the debate continues, as those concerned for the environment butt heads with those concerned for the economy. If you, like many, feel like you want cleaner air sooner than the debates will allow, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier to remove the majority of toxins from the air in your home, office or recreational space.

  • Canada moves toward cleaner air

    Amid all the disagreements in America over clear air legislation, its northern neighbors have put forth a plan to spend over $600 million in the next five years to address air quality concerns.

    Part of the plan also includes negotiations with the U.S. about the same issues, as sharing a border also means sharing air, and these changes in pollution law may have a large ripple effect in America.

    While the current plan makes no mention of specific steps to be taken to help clean the air, it does pledge to help with environmental reform and Canadian health by finding ways to safely and quickly decrease airborne toxins.

    While the goal is admirable, the lack of specificity in the plan does mean that any solutions discovered may take years to come into effect. If you'd like to see a change immediately instead, at least in your own home, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier like those we sell at FreshAirPro to clean your own air. Able to remove almost 100 percent of airborne pollutants, this equipment can help you get a jump start on the rest of North America.

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