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Clean Air

  • EPA's clean air restrictions gain backing in the days before the final version is released

    This is a big week for the Environmental Protection Agency, as Friday is the day it releases its final version of the controversial extension to the historic Clean Air Act.

    There has been much debate over these changes, with opponents of the change arguing that the effect the new laws will have on the economy would be disastrous when piled on to the already shaky financial foothold the nation has found. Supporters argue that the amount saved in the long run will more than outweigh any temporary drops, as the resulting increase in human life and health will severely reduce medical expenses while improving the environment greatly.

    The bill's detractors claim that the changes will also affect energy-producing factories and severely affect the national power grid. The EPA responds with claims that the majority of current energy-production facilities will have no problem coping with the changes, and the ones that might have an issue will be inspired to put more effort into researching and implementing cleaner energy to keep business going.

    While the debate rages on, the air near your home may remain full of toxins. To combat this, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier to keep your home clean and healthy.

  • Tempe leads the area in clean air technology

    Tempe is a city in Arizona that borders the state capitol of Phoenix, and it has put a lot of effort into keeping its air as clean as possible for its citizens. During the 24th annual Clean Air Campaign luncheon, Tempe was awarded for the efforts it has made to keep pollution and emissions down.

    Tempe was especially recognized for its attempt at making transportation as green as possible. One of the ways the city has accomplished this is by encouraging and celebrating bikers rather than drivers. The Tour de Tempe is an annual free 10-mile bike race that is meant to show bicyclists the many bike paths and routes residents can regularly enjoy.

    The city also sponsors a 'ride your bike to work day' that includes various restaurants and event locations that have giveaways and free meals for participants. City employees are required to use public transportation where possible, and Tempe spends part of its transportation budget just buying passes for these employees. The city even plays host to a fleet of carbon-neutral taxis.

    Though there are many efforts to make air clean all over the country, there is always more to do. To keep your home cleaner, consider investing in a medical-grade home air purifier to keep your family safe and healthy all year long.

  • Kansas and other states to benefit from upcoming clean air rules

    The debate over the details of the Clean Air Act rages on in the political arenas of the country, but one rule change that was finalized recently aims to protect states from being polluted by their neighbors.

    The Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) will have states that create the majority of pollution in the country tighten their air quality standards to prevent neighboring states from being negatively effected by the emissions. This rule applies heavily to those states with a high number of coal-based power plants, and was one of the points of contention between those who claim changing air regulations will hurt the economy and those who are backing the laws.

    One way to help understand the rule is to look at it as if it's a large-scale version of many of the smoking laws passed in the past few years. The CSAPR is an attempt to keep some states from hurting others with their large-scale secondhand smoke.

    This new law doesn't go into effect until 2012, so if you want to improve the quality of air you breathe now, invest in an air purifier to leave your home or office full of fresh, clean air.

  • Austin continues the battle against secondhand smoke

    Over the past few years, smoking has become more and more of a hot button issue. The debate between smokers and non-smokers mostly consists of a back and forth over rights, and bans on smoking are only growing stricter.

    Austin is one city that has decided to move forward with its attempt to protect citizens from unwanted secondhand smoke. Of course, arguments have arisen, with smokers claiming they don't deserve to be treated like second-class citizens because of their addiction and everyone else rebutting that secondhand smoke is a danger to everyone, and therefore must be controlled as much as possible.

    Among other changes, Austin has instituted bans within 15 feet of public areas, including bus stops and parks. Austin Community College has taken it a step further in an attempt to become a completely smoke-free campus.

    The dangers of secondhand smoking have been researched and are proven to be quite severe. If you want to protect yourself or your family from secondhand smoke, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier. With this powerful air-cleaning technology, you can remove up to 99.5 percent of toxins from the air in your home.

  • Clean air fairs celebrate healthy air

    As science advances and the information it uncovers becomes more readily available and understandable, many individuals are paying increasing attention to the planet's environment. "Environmentally friendly" has become a rallying cry that very few people disagree with. Air pollution is one of the many issues that people are beginning to take more seriously.

    As a result, or perhaps a reflection of the current state of mind that many Americans share, fairs and celebrations promoting clean air have begun sprouting up all over the country. The goals of these fairs can range from building awareness to lobbying for change, and everything in between - often all at once.

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District is holding a fair aimed at seniors in Indio, California, to promote clean air tactics. The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission has held a Clean Air Fair for the past seven years to promote green, pollution-reducing technology, encourage commuters to practice less driving and more cycling and take more steps to improve their health through the use of both commercial and home air purifiers.

    Clean air has become very important to many people, and that number grows every year. The awareness that these fairs inspire is a big step toward change.

  • Clean air and the economy

    Deciding on a way to reduce pollution levels has been a major debate between those who take great stock in the environment and those who hold stock. The economic implications of reducing air pollution and tightening air laws has always been one of the main reasons not to make huge changes all at once.

    Now, with the recently proposed tightening of restrictions, one of the major arguments against the change is that the cost of implementing such a thing is a poor decision, especially in the face of the recession.

    Now, however, according to statistics by the EPA, many of those claims regarding the economic instability these changes would cause are shortsighted and ultimately incorrect. Within four years, the cross-state air pollution rules are projected to avoid nearly 34,000 deaths and could save $120 billion in healthcare costs, which would more than offset the projected $800 million cost of implementing the rule.

    Still, the debate continues, as those concerned for the environment butt heads with those concerned for the economy. If you, like many, feel like you want cleaner air sooner than the debates will allow, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier to remove the majority of toxins from the air in your home, office or recreational space.

  • Canada moves toward cleaner air

    Amid all the disagreements in America over clear air legislation, its northern neighbors have put forth a plan to spend over $600 million in the next five years to address air quality concerns.

    Part of the plan also includes negotiations with the U.S. about the same issues, as sharing a border also means sharing air, and these changes in pollution law may have a large ripple effect in America.

    While the current plan makes no mention of specific steps to be taken to help clean the air, it does pledge to help with environmental reform and Canadian health by finding ways to safely and quickly decrease airborne toxins.

    While the goal is admirable, the lack of specificity in the plan does mean that any solutions discovered may take years to come into effect. If you'd like to see a change immediately instead, at least in your own home, consider investing in a medical-grade air purifier like those we sell at FreshAirPro to clean your own air. Able to remove almost 100 percent of airborne pollutants, this equipment can help you get a jump start on the rest of North America.

  • Electricity and clean air

    While there has been much debate over the newly proposed changes to the regulation of pollution, energy consumption may no longer be part of the argument. When the proposals were first put forth, many opponents of the changes cited concerns that further reducing the allowable pollution would not only hurt the economy, but also cause problems with energy consumption.

    This defense against the proposed tightening regulations was based on the idea that the machines and materials needed to implement the change would be almost useless because the increased energy consumption would be worse in the long run than putting off pollution reduction.

    The North American Electric Reliability Corporation study shows that the technologies already exist to create a manageable solution to this objection. This NERC announcement has taken away one of the main arguments standing in the way of clean air reform.

    Still, there is much debate and the proposed changes aren't likely to take effect immediately. If you're concerned about the health of your family, invest in a medical-grade air purifier. They can remove up to 99.5 percent of airborne toxins, and keep those breathing inside your home as healthy as possible.

  • Government reaction to smog proposal is surprising

    The last time smog limits were set was during the presidency of George W. Bush, and even at the time, environmental advocates claimed that the smog limit level was too high. In response to that, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed dropping the restriction from 70 parts per billion of smog to 65 parts per billion.

    The small difference was estimated to possibly prevent up to 7,200 deaths, 11,000 hospital visits and 38,000 cases of severe asthma per year. Opponents to the proposal immediately argued the timing of the bill, claiming it would cost nearly $90 billion to enact the law, something that couldn't be afforded in the recession.

    President Obama rejected the proposal to the surprise of members of the EPA, saying that if he remains in office he'd be happy to look back into the request as early as 2013, but that the timing for such a drastic change would cost too much at the moment.

    During the wait to see if restrictions do indeed get tighter on smog emissions, you can still protect the health of your family by investing in a medical-grade air purifier like those we sell at FreshAirPro to reduce the level of pollutants in your home. These purifiers can help eliminate the vast majority of airborne pollutants and other irritants.

  • Celebrating the Clean Air Act

    The Clean Air Act was originally passed back in 1963 and greatly expanded in 1970 under Richard Nixon on the eve of the new year. Over the years, it has gone through a variety of changes including another amendment in 1977. It was one of the first major environmental laws passed in the United States, and the first to include a provision for citizen suits. The citizen suit addition meant that private citizens could take steps to enforce environmental laws, adding an element of honesty in places that otherwise might have slipped under the radar.

    The most recent change was a major addition of amendments passed 21 years ago this week. These new amendments provided for major problems facing the country such as acid rain, urban air pollution, toxic air emissions and the depletion of the ozone layer.

    This portion of the act also introduced emission trading, or economic incentives for companies that successfully reduced their emissions. The amendments also affected the creation and importation of cars, putting limitations on acceptable level of emissions from gasoline.

    This year, celebrate the birthday of the most recent incarnation of the Clean Air Act by improving the quality of air in your home. Invest in a medical-grade air purifier to make your home's air as safe and clean as possible.

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