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Clean Air

  • New York's air quality reaches 50-year best

    Living in a major city can have its drawbacks, especially when you have to deal with the pollution that stems from heavy traffic and a large population. New York City is taking steps to limit these problems, however, and citywide efforts have resulted in The Big Apple having its best air quality in 50 years. 

    The New York Times reported that sulfur dioxide levels have fallen 69 percent since 2008, while soot pollution has also dropped more than 23 percent since 2007. Much of this can be attributed to businesses throughout the area moving to cleaner fuels. 

    "The continued health benefits of this conversion to cleaner heating fuels will make it the single biggest step to save lives since we began our comprehensive smoking control program," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said at a new conference, as quoted by The New York Times. "... When you look at the results like that, at the lives being saved and the illnesses being prevented, it tells you that we're definitely doing something right." 

    Although air quality in New York is improving, there is still a lot of work that can be done to improve the environment in your own home. Many city residents use air purifiers, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas, to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants. Whether you want to reduce household odors, second-hand smoke or airborne toxins, these air filter purifiers can make a big difference. 

  • Asthma is one of the biggest barriers to learning in children

    Parents often want to put their children in the best position to succeed. However, this can be difficult if a child has a health problem that inhibits his or her ability to learn. A recent study, titled "Crisis in the Classroom: How Untreated Medical Problems Are Seen To Interfere With School," looked at just how serious and prevalent some of these issues are. 

    The study found that more than 60 percent of principals and assistant principals in New York City cited asthma as a barrier to learning. These educators believed that asthma was more detrimental to learning than vision problems or dental pain, among other health issues. 

    "As America struggles to improve the academic performance of our children, we need to focus on the reality that an alarming number of children are walking into their schools each day with significant health barriers to learning," said Dr. Irwin Redlener, director of the Child Well-Being and Resilience Program at Columbia University. "... Many of these health problems are readily preventable, treatable or manageable, and we must do a better job of ensuring that all kids are healthy and ready to learn." 

    While parents may not be able to control every aspect of a learning environment for their child, they can take steps to improve the air quality in their own home. Investing in a home air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas can help to rid the air of ultrafine particles or noxious fumes that may interfere with a child's day-to-day life.

  • Ozone regulations upheld by federal court judge

    Environmental policy can be notoriously difficult to draft and even harder to enforce, as evidenced by a recent legal decision in Washington, D.C. A federal court judge recently upheld the ozone regulations set forth by former President George W. Bush in 2008, reports The Associated Press. 

    The air pollution standard in question refers to a mandate signed into law by Bush governing acceptable levels of ozone in the atmosphere. During his initial presidential campaign, President Barack Obama vowed to strengthen the law to protect public health, but eventually decided against it due to pressure from Republicans who argued that any tightening of the laws would have a negative economic impact.

    Many environmental advocates and public health officials were disappointed by the ruling that the standards are sufficient. However, some states, such as Missouri, which had challenged the EPA's research, agreed with the decision, claiming the regulations promised by Obama would be too stringent, according to E&E News.

    Ozone is one of the most harmful chemical elements present in smog, and can be a powerful irritant, especially to individuals with respiratory ailments like asthma. Parents who want to protect themselves and their children from the effects of smog and ozone may want to invest in an IQAir GC MultiGas medical-grade air filtration system to ensure the air in their homes is clean.

  • Ozone regulations upheld by federal court judge

    Environmental policy can be notoriously difficult to draft and even harder to enforce, as evidenced by a recent legal decision in Washington, D.C. A federal court judge recently upheld the ozone regulations set forth by former President George W. Bush in 2008, reports The Associated Press. 

    The air pollution standard in question refers to a mandate signed into law by Bush governing acceptable levels of ozone in the atmosphere. During his initial presidential campaign, President Barack Obama vowed to strengthen the law to protect public health, but eventually decided against it due to pressure from Republicans who argued that any tightening of the laws would have a negative economic impact.

    Many environmental advocates and public health officials were disappointed by the ruling that the standards are sufficient. However, some states, such as Missouri, which had challenged the EPA's research, agreed with the decision, claiming the regulations promised by Obama would be too stringent, according to E&E News.

    Ozone is one of the most harmful chemical elements present in smog, and can be a powerful irritant, especially to individuals with respiratory ailments like asthma. Parents who want to protect themselves and their children from the effects of smog and ozone may want to invest in an IQAir GC MultiGas medical-grade air filtration system to ensure the air in their homes is clean.

  • Strong public support for greater smoking bans around children

    Smoking is one of the leading causes of respiratory illness and preventable death in the U.S. However, the health risks associated with tobacco smoke are not limited to the smoker, as second-hand smoke has also been proven to be extremely hazardous to health. According to a recent survey, many adults strongly support the introduction of additional measures intended to limit children's exposure to tobacco smoke.

    The National Poll on Children's Health, conducted by researchers at Mott Children's Hospital at the University of Michigan, suggests many adults firmly oppose exposing children to tobacco smoke and support legislation designed to prohibit smoking around children. Approximately 87 percent of respondents indicated they agreed with proposals for laws banning smoking in businesses where children could be exposed to second-hand smoke. An additional 75 percent supported measures that would ban smoking in homes with children suffering from asthma and other respiratory conditions.

    Even adults who do not smoke may be concerned about their children's respiratory health. These individuals may want to consider investing in an IQAir GC MultiGas medical-grade air filtration system to ensure the quality of the air in their home is as high as it possibly can be.

  • Air quality advocates in Utah reach out to local leaders

    In Utah, activists are asking local administrators to dedicate resources toward improving the state's air quality levels. According to the Deseret News, a group of air quality advocates met on January 26, 2013, to discuss possible ways for Utah officials to address air pollution throughout the state

    "I feel frustrated and I feel angry at our political leaders for not taking action on what [residents] consider to be one of the most important issues," Cherise Udell, founder of Utah Moms for Clean Air, told the news source.

    Udell noted that air quality activists are creating a pledge that lawmakers could sign to show their support for eliminating air pollution. Additionally, the Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment, which represents medical professionals across the state, recently sent a petition to Governor Gary Herbert to urge state officials to find solutions to various air quality issues. 

    With a high-end air purifier like the IQAir® GC MultiGas, people can receive effective gas and odor control. The unit is a reliable choice for business operators and homeowners because if offers high-efficiency particulate filtration by removing more than 97 percent of particles before they reach the gas phase. 

  • Illinois county officials review air quality levels

    In Cook County, Illinois, local administrators are closely examining air quality levels after collecting data about particles, smog and toxic chemicals. According to Medill Reports, Cook County Environmental Control officials want to determine if air quality has improved throughout the region since 2011. 

    "A lot of this data is actually coming from our work and we're very proud of that," county Environmental Control representative Deborah Stone told the news source. 

    Stone noted that the information could significantly affect the county's future air quality policies. In fact, research showed that there was an 8 percent decrease in toxic air pollutants in Cook County in 2011, thanks in part to area officials' dedication to complying with Clean Air Act regulations. 

    Additionally, county Environmental Control officials are working with members of various departments to ensure that they put pollution limits on heavy-emission diesel vehicles that are commonly used by construction and maintenance companies. With new regulations in place, Cook County administrators could further enhance air quality levels across the area. 

    The IQAir® GC MultiGas is a top choice for people who want enhanced molecular and particulate contaminant control. This air purifier offers excellent filtration of particles and features an innovative triple seal design to increase the system's efficiency. 

  • Four Oklahoma employers receive Clean Air Act citations

    The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) issued penalties against four employers in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, in December 2012. According to the Muskogee Phoenix, these companies were cited for violations of the Clean Air Act.

    State officials have fined various businesses over the past three years due to numerous act violations. Monetary penalties were assessed against two Oklahoma employers last month, and all four facilities will search for ways to resolve air quality concerns.

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrators said that 36 Muskogee County employers are subject to Clean Air Act permit requirements. Additionally, Oklahoma leaders will enforce penalties on businesses that disregard act regulations, regardless of whether these companies operate in Muskogee County.

    "DEQ responds to environmental violations throughout Oklahoma," DEQ representative Erin Hatfield told the news source. "It is simply a coincidence that four Muskogee area companies have come under enforcement action in the past three years."

    Use a high-grade air purifier like the Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier for deep and effective cleaning. The system is six times more powerful than typical air purifiers and features unique, 100 percent pressure sealed technology that prevents bioburdens, particulates and VOCs from escaping. 

  • Kentucky utility company penalized for clean air violations

    Kentucky Utilities (KU), a regulated electric utility in Lexington, Kentucky, was recently fined for numerous clean air offenses. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials ordered the company to install a new sulfuric acid mist emission control system. Additionally, KU administrators will spend $500,000 on an environmental mitigation project for an elementary school in its service area.

    The company will invest $57 million for the new system and to replace a coal-fired boiler, and faces a civil penalty of $300,000 due to Clean Air Act violations at its Ghent, Kentucky, facility. EPA administrators said the citations against the utility could help reduce sulfuric acid mist emissions.

    "Reducing emissions of this pollutant is vital to protect the local environment and health of the residents of this community," EPA spokesperson Gwendolyn Keyes-Fleming said.

    IQAir® GC MultiGas enables business operators and homeowners to stay safe against harmful pollutants such as ethanol, ozone and vinyl chloride. The air purifier has an interchangeable cartridge design that delivers optimal gaseous pollutant control and is designed to meet gas phase removal needs in both commercial and residential environments. 

  • Clean-air supporters target Minnesota power plant

    Six groups of clean-air advocates have filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reduce emissions at a Minnesota power plant. According to the Sherburne County Citizen, the clean-air supporters claim that officials at the Sherco power plant in Becker, Minnesota, need to employ the best available technology to reduce emissions.

    Kevin Reuther, legal director for the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy, said he feels Sherco, which operates the largest power plant in Minnesota, is releasing emissions that could cause heart and lung disease throughout the state.

    "Sherco is a huge emissions source," Reuther told the news source. "People don't realize that when they are way up in the Boundary Waters [Canoe Area Wilderness] they are breathing emissions from the plant in Sherburne County."

    The clean-air supporters are suing the EPA in the hopes that the agency will order Sherco to update its technology. Group members claim that the pollution from the coal-fired Sherco plant is a major contributor to haze that obscures views of some of the state's national parks.

    With the Airgle® PurePal® AG800 Air Purifier, people can use a high-end, medical-grade unit to remove molecular and particulate pollutants. The air purifier has an ultra-quiet design and registers an extremely low 33 dB while continuously cleaning the air.

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