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  • Asthma could lead to bone problems, study shows

    People who have been diagnosed with asthma have their hands full dealing with the symptoms of the respiratory condition that often plagues them. However, asthma may pose health issues that affect all parts of the body. 

    A study published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology noted that people with asthma or asthma-related breathing problems may be at risk for bone loss. According to the research, people who had symptoms of these conditions also had significantly lower bone density. 

    "Asthma could be a risk for bone loss," Dr. Sonal Singh told Reuters Health. "The degree to which their disease puts them at risk for bone loss and fractures needs to be further studied. We should be thinking about fractures in patients with asthma." 

    There are not any foolproof ways to prevent asthma - individuals can only hope to take steps that keep the condition in check and prevent further damage. Many choose to invest in home air purifiers such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device can clear many irritants and allergens from the air, making it easier to breathe and decreasing the risk of an asthma attack. 

  • Kitchen ventilation is key for lung health

    When most people think about their respiratory health, they focus mainly on the air quality of the great outdoors. While concern about heavy traffic and pollution may be warranted, individuals should not overlook the potential irritants in their own homes. 

    A study published in PLOS Medicine recently connected lung problems with kitchen ventilation. Poorly ventilated spaces can lead to smoke and odors lingering about, which in turn could result in harmful chemicals sticking around. People who take steps to improve these aspects of their lives reduce the risk of the onset of pulmonary conditions. 

    Lung function is also tied to these factors. People may find it is easier to breathe when they aren't inhaling harmful byproducts constantly. 

    The research noted that individuals who want to improve the indoor air quality of their home should focus on switching up the cooking fuels they use. They can also check the ventilation of their kitchen space. Even a small change can result in massive improvements, all the while allowing devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas to clear the air of remaining irritants. 

  • Smoke-free policies provide a boost to heart health

    Many people do whatever they can to take care of their hearts, whether it is eating right, exercising or engaging in other healthy lifestyle choices. However, others who smoke in public places or work offices may be undoing all of the good efforts.

    A study presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session found that indoor smoking bans led to a significant decrease in hospital admissions for heart attacks. Because secondhand smoke is a factor in 50,000 deaths each year, the prospect of eliminating it from areas is one that is attractive to many. Not to mention, it could save lives in the process. 

    Although individuals can take steps to improve the air quality around their homes, such as by investing in a home air purifier, more needs to be done. Medical-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas are ideal for clearing the air of smoke indoors, but even they cannot protect people once they leave their homes. 

    "Health care can't just take place at the individual level. It must be multipronged, and that includes public health policies being implemented at the highest levels," said Dr. Sourabh Aggarwal, the lead investigator of the study. 

  • Smoke-free policies provide a boost to heart health

    Many people do whatever they can to take care of their hearts, whether it is eating right, exercising or engaging in other healthy lifestyle choices. However, others who smoke in public places or work offices may be undoing all of the good efforts.

    A study presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session found that indoor smoking bans led to a significant decrease in hospital admissions for heart attacks. Because secondhand smoke is a factor in 50,000 deaths each year, the prospect of eliminating it from areas is one that is attractive to many. Not to mention, it could save lives in the process. 

    Although individuals can take steps to improve the air quality around their homes, such as by investing in a home air purifier, more needs to be done. Medical-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas are ideal for clearing the air of smoke indoors, but even they cannot protect people once they leave their homes. 

    "Health care can't just take place at the individual level. It must be multipronged, and that includes public health policies being implemented at the highest levels," said Dr. Sourabh Aggarwal, the lead investigator of the study. 

  • Asthma medications can lead to other health problems

    Asthma treatments come in many different forms. For those individuals with severe respiratory problems, medications, such as steroids, can be a big help. However, these treatments may have some side effects that could interfere with everyday life. 

    According to a new study published in the journal Respiratory Medicine, people with severe asthma who use steroids to treat the condition are up to three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than those who do not use the drug for asthma treatment. Previous research has linked steroid use to mood fluctuations and asthma to depression, Reuters Health reported. 

    "There's a well-established connection with asthma, as well as chronic illness in general, and higher reports of depression in the general population," Dr. Rebecca Hashim told Reuters Health. 

    Some individuals may have to turn to medications to find relief from asthma, but others could reap the benefits of home air purifiers. These medical-grade devices, especially versions such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus, can work to clear allergens and irritants out of the air. That creates a more hospitable indoor space for anyone with respiratory problems and may cut back on the need for other medications. 

  • Maximize New Year's resolutions regarding personal health

    The start of a new year typically means new beginnings and a clean slate for people all around the country. Many choose to dedicate themselves to making lifestyle changes such as losing weight and exercising, while others prefer to begin the year by cleaning out homes. However, working out and scrubbing a home can quickly fall by the wayside, especially if dust, allergens and odors are stuck circulating around a space. 

    Some individuals choose to invest in professional-grade air purifiers, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. These devices are capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants, including smoke, pet odors, cooking smells and chemicals. Not only can that make a home more comfortable, but it can also work to make an environment better for exercising, or it can make cleaning more effective. 

    Anyone looking to start 2014 off on the right foot should be putting themselves in a position to succeed. A large part of that is finding the right environment, which should be one that encourages personal health while also relieving conditions, such as asthma or allergies, that may inhibit plans. Instead of letting these health concerns dictate resolutions, take advantage of home air purifiers and the many benefits they offer. 

  • Secondhand smoke related to asthma in children

    The dangers of secondhand smoke have been well documented. As such, many parents are concerned with protecting kids from these harmful vapors, and research suggests they have good reason to be. Secondhand smoke has been found to aggravate asthma in children, which in turn can lead to missed school days, poor sleeping habits and an aversion to physical activity, Reuters reported. 

    "I think the most important factor is that even low level exposure - the kind of exposure that might happen with a parent who smokes outside - can have negative consequences," Dr. Karen M. Wilson, who studies exposure to secondhand smoke in children, told the news source. "Not smoking at all, and limiting exposure from other sources ... is the best way to protect children with asthma." 

    Protecting children from secondhand smoke is of the utmost importance, but some parents will want to do more than simply keep kids away from smokers. Investing in a medical-grade home air purifier such as the IQAir GC MultiGas can be a good choice for these families. The filter is capable of ridding the air of a wide variety of chemicals and irritants, including secondhand smoke. 

  • New York's air quality reaches 50-year best

    Living in a major city can have its drawbacks, especially when you have to deal with the pollution that stems from heavy traffic and a large population. New York City is taking steps to limit these problems, however, and citywide efforts have resulted in The Big Apple having its best air quality in 50 years. 

    The New York Times reported that sulfur dioxide levels have fallen 69 percent since 2008, while soot pollution has also dropped more than 23 percent since 2007. Much of this can be attributed to businesses throughout the area moving to cleaner fuels. 

    "The continued health benefits of this conversion to cleaner heating fuels will make it the single biggest step to save lives since we began our comprehensive smoking control program," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said at a new conference, as quoted by The New York Times. "... When you look at the results like that, at the lives being saved and the illnesses being prevented, it tells you that we're definitely doing something right." 

    Although air quality in New York is improving, there is still a lot of work that can be done to improve the environment in your own home. Many city residents use air purifiers, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas, to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants. Whether you want to reduce household odors, second-hand smoke or airborne toxins, these air filter purifiers can make a big difference. 

  • Asthma is one of the biggest barriers to learning in children

    Parents often want to put their children in the best position to succeed. However, this can be difficult if a child has a health problem that inhibits his or her ability to learn. A recent study, titled "Crisis in the Classroom: How Untreated Medical Problems Are Seen To Interfere With School," looked at just how serious and prevalent some of these issues are. 

    The study found that more than 60 percent of principals and assistant principals in New York City cited asthma as a barrier to learning. These educators believed that asthma was more detrimental to learning than vision problems or dental pain, among other health issues. 

    "As America struggles to improve the academic performance of our children, we need to focus on the reality that an alarming number of children are walking into their schools each day with significant health barriers to learning," said Dr. Irwin Redlener, director of the Child Well-Being and Resilience Program at Columbia University. "... Many of these health problems are readily preventable, treatable or manageable, and we must do a better job of ensuring that all kids are healthy and ready to learn." 

    While parents may not be able to control every aspect of a learning environment for their child, they can take steps to improve the air quality in their own home. Investing in a home air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas can help to rid the air of ultrafine particles or noxious fumes that may interfere with a child's day-to-day life.

  • Ozone regulations upheld by federal court judge

    Environmental policy can be notoriously difficult to draft and even harder to enforce, as evidenced by a recent legal decision in Washington, D.C. A federal court judge recently upheld the ozone regulations set forth by former President George W. Bush in 2008, reports The Associated Press. 

    The air pollution standard in question refers to a mandate signed into law by Bush governing acceptable levels of ozone in the atmosphere. During his initial presidential campaign, President Barack Obama vowed to strengthen the law to protect public health, but eventually decided against it due to pressure from Republicans who argued that any tightening of the laws would have a negative economic impact.

    Many environmental advocates and public health officials were disappointed by the ruling that the standards are sufficient. However, some states, such as Missouri, which had challenged the EPA's research, agreed with the decision, claiming the regulations promised by Obama would be too stringent, according to E&E News.

    Ozone is one of the most harmful chemical elements present in smog, and can be a powerful irritant, especially to individuals with respiratory ailments like asthma. Parents who want to protect themselves and their children from the effects of smog and ozone may want to invest in an IQAir GC MultiGas medical-grade air filtration system to ensure the air in their homes is clean.

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