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  • Winter-blend gas will not negatively impact California air quality

    A recent decision from Governor Jerry Brown to allow winter-blend gasoline to be sold in California to increase supply and lower record-high pump prices will not result in decreased air quality. The Washington Post reports that the California Air Resources Board announced its support of the claim after they analyzed the data.

    Brown believes the decision to sell the dirtier winter-blend gasoline earlier in the year is vital to lessening the financial burden on California residents. According to AAA, the average price for regular gas reached $4.668 on October 8, 2012 in the coastal state.

    "This action is necessary to address the extreme and unusual fuel supply circumstance," said the board. "(It) is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety or general welfare."

    The Merced Sun-Star reports that California typically converts to the winter-gas blend on October 31. However, due to new circumstances, the mixture will soon be sold across the state. In areas with traditionally high levels of air pollution, environmental experts were concerned the switch could have a negative impact on air quality. Property owners with a similar concern can purchase a home air purifier to reduce the pollutants commonly found indoors.

  • Cutting air pollution can reduce future costs

    Improving air quality is not only an investment in the environment and for people's health - the venture can also reduce future expenses. According to C. Arden Pope, a Brigham Young University economist, for every dollar spent on cutting air pollution there are approximately $10 in savings.

    The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Pope claims air quality improvement spending will lead to a decrease in healthcare costs and expenses related to premature deaths.

    "What I do know is responsible efforts to clean up the air can make large contributions to human health, and they can reduce pollution-related health costs," Pope told the news source.

    While this news could impact the actions of businesses and government agencies, it might also prompt individuals to consider investing in a home air purifier.

    Homeowners interested in improving the air quality around them can purchase a home air purifier to reduce the presence of fine particulate matter and common pollutants. A model like the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier could not only improve your health for the sake of advancing your quality of life, but it can also reduce future expenses down the road.

  • Utah's air pollution controls could get a boost

    State officials in Utah are contemplating stricter controls on industrial pollution emissions. Bloomberg Businessweek reports that a sooty layer of pollution often settles in the heavily-populated area of Wasatch Front for weeks at a time. The natural shape of the region resembles a basin and traps smog and particulate matter, which can increase residents' exposure to poor air quality.

    Consequently, environmental groups and some state officials are calling for stricter emission standards to reduce pollution levels from 366 tons to 243 tons a day in the greater Salt Lake City region.

    "We'll be seeing huge reductions in emissions over the next five to seven years that really impact us during our winter inversion periods," Utah Division of Air Quality Director Bryce Bird told the news source. "These plans will work."

    Air pollution has been tied to numerous health problems. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, air pollution is associated with pulmonary, cardiac, vascular and neurological impairments. The longer a person is exposed to poor air quality, the greater chance they have of developing a health condition. However, by living in a house with a home air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier, a person will breath in less pollutants.

  • Glassmaker pays fine to settle air pollution allegations

    The southern New Jersey glassmaker Durand Glass Manufacturing has agreed to pay civil penalties to both state and federal governments to settle air pollution gains. Bloomberg Businessweek reports that the enterprise will pay $300,000 to settle the allegations that claimed it had violated air pollution standards. Half of the fine will go to the state government and the other half to federal authorities. However, without a federal judge's consent, the settlement will not go into effect.

    In addition, the firm has installed pollution control equipment at its Millville plant to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 174 tons per year. Particulate matter will also shrink by 24 tons per year. While industry plays a large role in the health of a local economy, poor air quality is sometimes a drawback for area residents.

    Homeowners concerned about the impact of plants, factories or other large commercial properties on air quality can invest in a home air purifier. A unit such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier will reduce the presence of fine particulate matter in a home and limit common pollutants.

  • Memphis air pollution programs suffer

    The Commercial Appeal reports that 2012 was one of Memphis' smoggiest summers in years, and local air pollution programs remain in turmoil. Despite the record-high pollution levels reported within the city, air quality programs are under strain.

    The City Council voted in August 2012 to cut the current $2.7 million inspection program after June 30 to reduce strain on an already tight budget. However, Shelby County could take up the slack and impose a new measuring strategy.

    One new plan proposes that Shelby and Memphis residents who own a vehicle should pay a nominal $10 fee to have their vehicles inspected for emissions. However, this is just one proposal out of many.

    For Memphis and Shelby County residents, the idea of living with long-term exposure to high levels of air pollution is concerning. Poor air quality has been linked to increased risk of heart attack, stroke, cancer and respiratory distress. Investing in a home air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier will reduce the presence of harmful toxins within a house.

  • Air quality in your home

    Most people understand that air quality outdoors can be hazardous to a person’s health at times, depending on the conditions outside and the location. Between wildfires blazing out west to smog hovering overhead in the industrial cities of the east, it seems like many parts of the country are consistently working to decrease air pollution.

    However, have you considered the quality of the air in your own home? You might think that the air you’re breathing in your living room or bedroom is safe enough, but it might be more hazardous to your health than you think. According to WebMD, air quality inside homes can be even more polluted than the air outdoors due to dust, mold, fire-retardants, radon, formaldehyde and chemicals in your cleaners and other household items.

    In order to improve the air quality in your house, the United State Environmental Protection Agency suggests trying to improve the ventilation in your home. Open windows and doors and turn on fans when able to increase the amount of outdoor air coming indoors.

    If you’re worried about bringing outdoor pollutants inside, try using a home air purifier. A purifier can reduce particulate matter and other toxins in your house to make it a more enjoyable, healthier place to live.

  • Wildfires causing more air pollution

    Lately it seems like you can't turn on the news without seeing something about wildfires in the Midwest and on the West Coast. The latest area to make headlines is northern Utah where multiple wildfires are contributing to an air pollution problem.

    The Salt Lake City Tribune reports that state air-quality officials placed much of northern Utah under a "red" advisory on September 18th due to the smoke coming from the wildfires blazing in central and northern Idaho. The warning covers Salt Lake, Weber, Utah, Davis, Tooele and Box Elder counties. A "yellow" advisory is in other counties around the state.

    "Persons with existing heart or respiratory ailments should reduce physical exertion and outdoor activity today," the state’s advisory issued Tuesday morning. "Hazy, smoky conditions in northern Utah valleys continue due to upper air transport of smoke from fires that continue to burn in California and Idaho."

    Pictures of the Salt Lake City skyline show the entire metropolitan area is blanketed in smoky haze.  Everyone with sensitive lungs or hearts, such as young or old people, have been advised to stay indoors. It may also be a good idea to keep an air purifier running at this time in homes to capture particulate matter and other harmful toxins.

  • Are cheeseburgers hurting our air quality?

    Most people can agree that there's nothing more satisfying than sinking your teeth into a big, juicy cheeseburger or hamburger. Although summer has come to an end, there's a few more weeks ahead that will likely be warm enough still to fire up the grill and charbroil a burger for everyone in the family. It's a dinner party that certainly everyone will be happy to attend.

    However, is it possible that grilling burgers could have an impact on the environment and our air quality? This is what researchers at the University of California, Riverside are saying. According to The New York Times, scientists at the university have concluded that producing a charbroiled hamburger emits the same mass particulate matter as a heavy-duty diesel truck that travels 143 miles. The particulate matter is come from the fatty acids in the meat that fall down into the fire, evaporate and eventually condense into smoke.

    "Generally, clean diesels are matched up against natural gas, hybrids or electric vehicles," Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum told the publication. "This is the first time we’ve gone head-to-head against fast food."

    In order to protect your family from inhaling these toxins, you might want to consider using an air purifier in your home. The IQAIR HealthPro Plus combines advanced filtration technologies to reduce an array of particulate and molecular pollutants. It can help keep the air in your home clean so you can keep enjoying your burgers.

  • The wheels on the bus go round and round

    When you were a kid, you probably sang the little melody, "the wheels on the bus go round and round, all through the town." It's a lovely tune, but it's safe to say that now the song should go something like, "…round and round, spreading pollution all through the town."

    Unfortunately though, this may be the version children might have to start singing. That's because a recent report has found California school buses still in use are polluting the air.According to the Huffington Post, state data shows tens of thousands of California kids ride to school on buses that emit harmful pollutants. So why doesn't the school system update the bus system?

    "Back in the '60s and '70s, districts had budgeted school bus replacement programs," John Clements, the director of transportation for Kings Canyon Unified School District, told the news source. "That's not the case under our stiffer fiscal situations. It would be rare to find one."

    If your child rides the bus in California, it may be time to consider alternate forms of transportation to school. However, there's something you can do at home, too. A home air purifier can reduce toxins in your home so your children can be exposed to fewer pollutants during the day. While you can't always control what the school system does, you can control the air quality in your home.

  • Where has air quality improved?

    If someone were to ask you where the most polluted cities are, where would you guess? Perhaps you would say a city in New Jersey or smog-filled Los Angeles. But it turns out that some cities a person might think has bad air quality actually are where some of the best environmental success stories take place.

    According to a recent report from Bloomberg, Los Angeles has played a significant role in air pollution improvement over the last several decades. Due to the position of the Southern California city, between the mountains in the east and the ocean in the west, the publication states that it lends itself to air pollution. However, it was the first state to regulate air pollution in 1967 when then-Governor Ronald Regan signed the Air Resources Act.

    The Clean Air Act was signed three years later by President Richard Nixon, allowing the entire country to follow in California's footsteps. Therefore, it's important to understand that the places where you might think are causing environmental problems, like Los Angeles, may actually the ones leading the nation in the right direction.

    Whether you live in Los Angeles, the Jersey Shore or any other city in the country, though, you can make sure your home has clean, fresh air at all time. Air purifier IQAir HealthPro Plus uses advance filtration technologies to ensure air pollutants are filtered.

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