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  • Is it allergies or a cold? Knowing the symptoms can lead to the right relief

    Allergy season is right around the corner in the U.S., and even though the season is about to start, many experts are worried patients will confuse certain cold symptoms with allergies. Dr. Stanley Fineman, an allergist and past president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, reports certain pollens can pop up during late February and early March, so learning the difference between allergy and cold symptoms is key in getting a patient the right treatment. 

    According to ABC News, there are differences between these two common issues that can help patients decipher what condition they have. 

    "A cold can be accompanied by low-grade fever, sore throat and a cough, whereas allergies usually don't have those things," Dr. William Schaffner told the publication. "You might have a little bit of sore throat with allergies, but it's mostly runny nose and red, itchy eyes."

    Other side effects that differ include feeling achy or having body pains, symptoms that can sometimes occur while battling a cold, but never happen with allergies. 

    Even if you understand the differences between a cold and allergies, it's never too early to start planning for the latter. A great way to ensure family members enjoy fresh air in the home is by installing a professional-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal CleanRoom AG900 to help eliminate pollen and other particles in the air.

  • Study finds no link between air pollution and rheumatoid arthritis

    Air pollution is a serious problem that seems to be getting worse, leading many people to install professional-grade air purifiers like the Airgle PurePal Plus AG850 to breathe easy at home. Despite the growing issue, a new study has found unhealthy air can be crossed off the list of possible reasons behind rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    Researchers have long believed that there could be a link between the form of arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease leading to inflammation of the joints, and air pollution. However, a new study may have debunked this idea. 

    Scientists from Brigham and Women's Hospital used the Nurses' Health Study, which has the medical records of more than 11.400 women from between 1976 and 2006, to look for RA incidents and a possible link to air pollution. A total of 858 women developed RA over the course of 30 years. Researchers used these participants' mailing addresses to gauge how close they lived to places of high air pollution as well as other known pollutant-makers like power plants and highways. 

    Overall, the researchers found no solid link between RA and air pollution. However, the authors are quick to point out that more trials need to be conducted to verify the recent findings.

    Even if there is no real connection to RA, air pollution can lead to a number of other serious medical conditions. Most recently, scientists from Rice University found cardiac arrest incidents went up on days when air pollution levels were above average. 

  • Get ready for allergy season ahead of time

    Spring is right around the corner, and even though this means longer days, better weather and blooming flowers, the warmer months also mark the beginning of allergy season. Since more than half (55 percent) of all Americans suffer from some type of allergy, according to WebMD, finding ways to deal with symptoms ahead of time is key. Dermatologist Carol Baum recently spoke with Women's Health magazine to discuss ways in which families can get ready for allergy season in an attempt to limit its effects. 

    The term "spring cleaning" is more than just a nice suggestion - it could actually help keep allergy symptoms at bay, according to Baum. Getting rid of dust and other grime in the home is crucial in reducing allergy effects even if people aren't allergic to such things. This is because dust, dirt and other particles in the home can irritate your respiratory system even if you're not allergic, which could only make things worse when allergy season is full blown. 

    Preparing your body by boosting your immune system is also key in the fight against allergies. Adding tons of foods filled with vitamin D and C can help keep you healthy, as can getting in more lean protein, like that from salmon or other fatty fish. 

    After cleaning and boosting the immune system, families can go one step further in preventing allergy-related flare-ups. Investing in professional grade air purifiers like Airgle PurePal AG800 can help people breathe better at home. 

  • College student comes up with plan to deal with air pollution

    Air pollution continues to be a major problem as it can not only affect how people breathe, it can also lead to serious medical conditions like asthma, allergies and even more serious respiratory illness, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. 

    Since issues with air pollution continue to come up, more researchers from around the globe are looking into ways to curb the side effects. The Times of India reports that Vijay Raj, a college student at Kalasalingam University, recently came up with a model that could combat air pollution. 

    Raj, a mechanical engineering student, created a model in which smoke and water mix together to create carbonic acid, which occurs when hydrogen in the water reacts with carbon dioxide, the news source reports. This procedure has been found to eliminate pollution and offer benefits as well. 

    "The carbonic acid could be used to generate electricity. The residue carbon could be used in carbon-based industries,'' Raj told the news source.

    Even though there could be a way to use Raj's method to rid cities of air pollution in the future, there are other ways families can enjoy fresh air now. Installing a medical grade air purifier like Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 in the home helps ensure people breathe easy in their dwellings.

  • More cities looking to educate residents on air pollution

    Air pollution is a growing problem around the world, but its effects are greatly felt in North America. This continent produces approximately 6 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, according to a joint study conducted by the Environmental Integrity Project, EarthJustice, and the Sierra Club. Due to the shocking numbers, more cities around the nation are looking into ways to cut their pollution.

    The city of Helena, Mont., is one such location, as the Lewis and Clark City-County Health Board is planning to voluntarily join an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) program in order to learn new methods of pollution reduction, the Helena Independent Record reports. The desire to join the EPA's Particulate Matter Advance Program comes after a survey found a shockingly low number of city residents believes the region has air pollution. 

    The survey, which questioned 270 random households, found 83 percent of respondents did not believe there was an air pollution problem in Helena, even though many here choose to heat their homes with firewood. This shocked members of the health board because this type of burning, along with car emissions, is among the biggest pollution issue in America.

    As more information comes out regarding the dangers of air pollution, some families might take comfort knowing they can breathe easy at home by installing professional grade air purifiers like the Airgle PurePal CleanRoom AG900.

  • Asthma could be passed down through generations

    Close to 18.9 million American adults are currently living with asthma, while more than 7 million children are also inflicted with the condition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. Even though certain factors like air pollution have been found to play a role in the development of asthma, a new trial finds that grandmothers' smoking habits could cause their grandchildren's condition.

    The study, published in the journal Review of Obstetrics & Gynecology, discovered this after reviewing the effects nicotine had on pregnant rats. During trials, scientists found rats who were given nicotine while pregnant gave birth to asthmatic babies. These baby mice then had babies of their own when they reached adulthood, and even though they did not ingest nicotine prior to giving birth, many of their babies were born with asthma. 

    Such findings suggest that the effects of nicotine can leave "heritable epigenetic marks on the genome, which make future offspring more susceptible to respiratory conditions," according to Science Daily.

    Even though more research needs to be conducted to verify these results, parents can still help their children who suffer from asthma now. Ensuring a child has an inhaler to deal with triggers and installing air purifiers like the Airgle PurePal CleanRoom AG900 in the home can ensure youngsters breathe only fresh air while relaxing with family. 

  • Air pollution could be linked to increased addiction risk

    Air pollution increases risk for a variety of medical conditions ranging from asthma to cardiac arrest, according to a recent study by Rice University. Now, new data has discovered air pollution typically found in urban regions may also trigger a behavior similar to addiction.

    The study, published in the journal Environmental Health Sciences, found that baby mice who were exposed to particles found in urban air grew more impatient in waiting for treats than a second group of mice who breathed in filtered air. In fact, 43 percent of the test group of mice hit a lever for treats instead of waiting for their reward. Mice who breathed only filtered air were much more patient when it came to wanting treats. More surprisingly, adult mice exposed to air pollution did not develop impatience like their younger peers.

    Researchers believe this shows that breathing in high levels of pollutants, like those from car exhaust, could negatively affect how much self-control people have if they've breathed bad air in at a young age - possibly highlighting a link between air pollution and addictive behavior. 

    Even though more research needs to be conducted to verify these results, parents can ensure their youngsters breathe in fresh air by installing professional grade air purifiers like the Airgle PurePal Plus AG850 into their homes.

  • Certain foods could suppress allergy symptoms

    More than half of all Americans (55 percent) have at least one allergy, WebMD reports. This leads many to spend more time indoors to avoid certain symptoms. Even though staying inside, breathing in fresh air thanks to a professional grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 is an option, so is changing your diet to reduce your allergy-related issues. 

    WebMD reports foods that are rich in antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients have been found to ease inflammation and mucus build-up caused by certain allergens in the air. 

    When it comes to breakfast, families may benefit from consuming homemade or low-sugar oatmeal paired with a full serving (1 cup) of fresh fruits to keep troublesome symptoms at bay. For lunch, sticking to a turkey or chicken sandwich made with light cream cheese and cranberry sauce may be best. Pair this meal with a side of three-bean salad to get plenty of fiber or light yogurt with fresh berries mixed in for an antioxidant punch. 

    Keep your family feeling good at dinner too, by serving up a creation of teriyaki salmon with hearty brown rice and broccoli. Eating meals that are made with fresh, vitamin-rich ingredients can keep people feeling less foggy during allergy season, letting them enjoy spending time in the great outdoors. 

  • Kids born outside the U.S. better protected against asthma, allergies

    Experts from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology have reported that the heavy snow in areas around the country followed by pre-spring rain has created the perfect habitat for spring allergies. However, a new study presented at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology has found where a person is born could be to blame for their allergies, rather than immediate environmental circumstances. 

    Researchers from St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and Oregon Health Science Center looked to test if there was any link between a person's birthplace, how long they've lived in the U.S. and their risk of allergies or asthma. 

    Scientists examined this idea by looking at the health records of nearly 92,000 children who participated in the National Survey of Children's Health. From the data, researchers discovered children born outside of the U.S. had lower rates of allergies than their peers born stateside. More surprisingly, scientists found children whose parents were also born outside of America benefited from lower allergy rates than their peers whose parents were born stateside.

    Even though parents may not be able to change where their kids were born, they can still help reduce their allergy symptoms in the home by installing medical grade air purifiers like the Airgle PurePal CleanRoom AG900 to let the whole family enjoy clean air.

  • Study finds air pollution may negatively effect immune system

    Allergies are more than just a nuisance, they're also a serious problem - one in five people in the U.S. have either allergy or asthma symptoms, while 55 percent of all Americans test positive for one or more allergens, WebMD reports. A recent study has linked air pollution to a rise in allergy and asthma incidents and the reason behind the spike may surprise some. 

    Scientists from Stanford University discovered that airborne toxins called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) seem to prohibit protective cells in the body from signaling the immune system to react. PAHs were also found to over-active certain immune prohibitors that allow the allergens to run rampant in the body.

    PAHs are sent into the air through burning fuel in diesel engines, wood fires and barbeque grills, according to Science News. 

    Asthma and allergies don't seem to be going away anytime soon, especially after the new information revealed in the recent study. Even though people may not be able to control the air they breath while outside, they do have the ability to improve the air quality in their homes. Installing professional-grade air purifiers like Airgle PurePal AG800 can help individuals breath easy while in the comfort of their personal dwellings.

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