Shop With ConfidenceFresh Air News

Author Archives: FreshAirPro

  • EPA examines regulations to control soot pollution

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently finalized air quality standards designed to protect Americans from soot pollution. Fine particles can cause serious health effects such as heart attacks and strokes, and the updated air quality standards are designed to help U.S. counties further protect citizens against these dangers.

    Agency officials said that they anticipate that 99 percent of U.S. counties could meet the revised health standard by 2020, without any additional action.

    "These standards are fulfilling the promise of the Clean Air Act," EPA representative Lisa P. Jackson said. "We will save lives and reduce the burden of illness in our communities."

    Fewer than 10 U.S. counties will need to perform actions to reduce fine particle pollution to meet the new standard, which is mandated by the Clean Air Act. Meanwhile, the remaining counties can follow existing federal guidelines to meet the new standard.

    Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier features enhanced technology to protect people against dust, pollen and other harmful particles. The air purifier is efficient and has 50 square feet of premium HEPAfast media to quickly remove irritating allergens.

  • Utah officials to develop new air pollution strategy

    The Utah Air Quality Board will create new air pollution guidelines after it deemed its previous standards insufficient. According to The Associated Press, board members said they intend to develop tougher regulations for Salt Lake City and much of the northern Utah urban sector.

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrators had set December 14, 2012, as the deadline for Utah leaders to establish up-to-date air pollution standards. However, Utah officials said they will miss the deadline, as these representatives will have more time to develop stricter policies for oil refineries and other industrial facilities.

    "It's better to have the right plan late than the wrong plan on time," Bruce Bird, director of the Utah Division of Air Quality, told the news source.

    Richard Mylott, an EPA spokesperson, noted that agency officials expect Utah leaders to work diligently to institute new air pollution regulations.

    A quality air purifier like the Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier absorbs many volatile compounds, including benzene, toulene and xylene. This air purifier eliminates potentially dangerous odors from chemicals, gases and hazardous molecular pollutants.

  • Decreasing air pollution helps raise life expectancy in United States

    Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health recently discovered a significant connection between the declining air pollution rates in the United States and the rising average life expectancy among the country's citizens. According to News-Medical, the research team found that there have been substantial reductions in air pollution over the past 10 years, which have helped improve life expectancy figures in many areas. However, Andrew Correia, a researcher with the Harvard School of Public Health, cautions that optimum air quality levels have not yet been reached.

    "The U.S. population as a whole is exposed to much lower levels of air pollution than 30 years ago...it appears that further reductions in air pollution levels would continue to benefit public health," Correia told the news source.

    Correia and other researchers collected data between 2000 and 2007 for their evaluation. Group members calculated the mean life expectancy change during this time frame in 545 U.S. counties, and also considered potential variables such as the number of residents who smoked and the socioeconomic status of citizens in these regions.

    The Airgle® PurePal® MultiGas AG950 Air Purifier is useful for people who want an efficient molecular and particle filtration system. This air purifier includes 100 percent pressure-sealed technology with no air bypass to ensure that no bioburdens, particulates or VOCs can escape.

  • Alaska parents and teachers fight against air pollution

    Parents and teachers at Woodriver Elementary School in Alaska's Fairbanks North Star Borough are trying to eliminate air pollution from the area. According to the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, the elementary school was severely hit by wintertime smoke, and local parents and educators have formed a committee to help combat air quality issues.

    A recently approved proposal prevents officials in the borough from enforcing air pollution regulations on home heating devices. However, parents and teachers are reaching out to state administrators to help relieve air pollution problems that have been shown to cause health problems.

    "As the parents, once we started looking into it more it was really concerning," local parent Carrie Dershin told the news source. "Seeing the levels and seeing how extremely poor it was for all the children was really concerning."

    The Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier features enhanced technology for chemical, microbe, odor and particle filtration. It is a quality air purifier with an ultra-quiet design, metal-frame housing and a powerful airflow that kills bacteria and viruses and safely breaks down dangerous chemicals and odors.

  • Massachusetts printing company cited for alleged clean air violations

    Suddekor Inc., a printing firm located in Agawam, Massachusetts, was recently fined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for allegedly violating the Federal Clean Air Act. EPA officials noted that the company's facility could potentially emit sufficient pollutants to be subject to the act's National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Printing and Publishing Facilities. Additionally, these administrators said the business would require a Title V operating permit under the Clean Air Act.

    The recent penalty imposed against Suddekor requires the company to submit a plan to the EPA about how it will reduce hazardous air pollutant emissions over time. Suddekor representatives said the company will use more environmentally friendly inks to help lower these emissions.

    In 1970, federal officials passed the Clean Air Act to alter the government's role in controlling air pollution. The regulation led to the creation of four major regulatory programs and comprehensive federal and state regulations to limit emissions from industrial and mobile sources.

    Airgle® PurePal® MultiGas AG950 Air Purifier is a top choice for many businesses because it effectively absorbs organic compounds like benzene, paint and xylene. This air purifier provides a powerful airflow up to 462 rated CFM and registers a low 33dB while constantly cleaning the air.

  • Iowa city targets air quality improvements

    In November 2012, sulfur dioxide (SO2) levels in Muscatine, Iowa, exceeded the standards established by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources' Ambient Air Monitoring Group. According to the Muscatine Journal, the city had 308.8 parts per billion for SO2, which equates to roughly an air quality index of more than 200, during a measurement on November 10.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that sulfur dioxide in the air comes primarily from activities associated with the burning of fossil fuels such as coal and oil at power plants or from copper smelting. SO2 can cause numerous health problems, including breathing, nose and throat issues, and Muscatine officials intend to improve the city's air quality.

    Jessica Brackett, executive director of Clean Air Muscatine, said that city officials are working with the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to resolve the higher-than-average SO2 levels in the area. The EPA established a February 2013 deadline for the state's Department of Natural Resources to develop a strategy for reducing air pollution in Iowa.

    The IQAir® GC MultiGas is helpful for people who want to effectively control Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. This air purifier features 12 lbs of Granulated Activated Carbon and a "Class A" HEPA Pre-Filter to provide enhanced gas and odor control.

  • EPA promotes public involvement in Texas air-pollution permits

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is encouraging Texas residents to become actively involved in helping the state control air pollution at power plants and other industrial facilities. According to the Houston Chronicle, the agency approved revised regulations for the Lone Star State's power plants and refineries on November 30, 2012.

    EPA officials noted that the public plays a role in the permit-approval process, and residents can offer input before a company receives a state-issued permit. Ron Curry, a local administrator with the EPA, said that public participation is essential for the agency's Clean Air Act to be successful. Amendments from this regulation are designed to help people avoid the dangers of air pollution, and under the recently accepted Texas legislation, agency representatives said they hope state residents will have easier access to documents and other information related to pending permits.

    With the Airgle® PurePal® MultiGas AG950 Air Purifier, a company that needs to handle air-pollution concerns can effectively safeguard its team members from these problems. This air purifier features 15 pounds of premium-grade activated carbon and a medical-grade cHEPA filter that is more than 99.991 percent efficient, and it performs at over 320 CADR while also meeting ENERGY STAR requirements.

  • First-ever no-burn alert issued for Southland

    For the first time ever, a no-burn alert order has been issued for Southland. A majority of the Los Angeles population is being asked to not light wood-burning fireplaces or open fire pits. The Los Angeles Times reports that the intent of the restriction is to reduce the levels of air pollution surrounding the city.

    The new program was adopted by the South Coast Air Quality Management District and applies to residents in West Hollywood, Burbank, the downtown area and many in the eastern portion of the San Fernando Valley. Violating the order comes with a $50 fine for first-time offenders.

    "Over 1 million homes actively use fireplaces to burn wood in Los Angeles,'' Sam Atwood, an agency spokesman at the South Coast Air Quality Management District, told the news source. "That results in four times the particulate pollution created by all of the power plants in the basin."

    Homeowners looking to reduce the presence of fine particulate matter within their house regardless of what time of year it is can purchase an IQAir HealthPro Plus Air. The medical-grade quality unit is intended to limit potential respiratory aggravators.

  • Most common air pollutants in America

    Americans concerned about the presence of air pollution in their community can monitor the posted concentrations of the six most common pollutants in the United Stated. The Environmental Protection Agency tracks levels of ozone, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and lead.

    The Clean Air Act requires the EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards for these six pollutants because they can be harmful to people's health and the environment and even cause property damage. These pollutants are tracked in two ways: by air concentration levels based on actual measurements of pollutant concentration in outside air at selected monitoring sites and by emission estimates made by experienced engineers and scientists.

    The limits based on human health requirements are referred to as primary standards. Another set of regulated levels, called secondary standards, is intended to prevent environmental and property damage.

    By investing in a home air purifier, a person can further limit the presence of common air pollutants in his or her house. The IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier can improve air quality within a home and help everyone remain safe and healthy.

  • Link between autism and air pollution strengthens

    New research shows that children with autism are two to three times more likely than other children to have been previously exposed to air pollution during infancy. Time Magazine reports that the study's findings were published in the Archives of General Psychiatry and show a link between early exposure to air pollution and autism spectrum disorders.

    "We're not saying that air pollution causes autism. We're saying it may be a risk factor for autism," Heather Volk, lead author on the new study and an assistant professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California, told the news source. "Autism is a complex disorder and it’s likely there are many factors contributing."

    The news source claims that researchers analyzed 500 children living in California. According to the study, children in the top 25 percent of pollution exposure were more likely to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder than kids in the bottom 25 percent of the pollution level scale.

    New parents or those about to become parents can install a home air purifier to reduce the presence of harmful air pollutants in the home. An IQAir HealthPro Plus HEPA Air purifier can improve air quality in a house and potentially have a positive impact on a child's health.

251-260 of 722 total

  1. ...
  2. 1
  3. 24
  4. 25
  5. 26
  6. 27
  7. 28
  8. 73
  9. ...