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  • Kentucky utility company penalized for clean air violations

    Kentucky Utilities (KU), a regulated electric utility in Lexington, Kentucky, was recently fined for numerous clean air offenses. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials ordered the company to install a new sulfuric acid mist emission control system. Additionally, KU administrators will spend $500,000 on an environmental mitigation project for an elementary school in its service area.

    The company will invest $57 million for the new system and to replace a coal-fired boiler, and faces a civil penalty of $300,000 due to Clean Air Act violations at its Ghent, Kentucky, facility. EPA administrators said the citations against the utility could help reduce sulfuric acid mist emissions.

    "Reducing emissions of this pollutant is vital to protect the local environment and health of the residents of this community," EPA spokesperson Gwendolyn Keyes-Fleming said.

    IQAir® GC MultiGas enables business operators and homeowners to stay safe against harmful pollutants such as ethanol, ozone and vinyl chloride. The air purifier has an interchangeable cartridge design that delivers optimal gaseous pollutant control and is designed to meet gas phase removal needs in both commercial and residential environments. 

  • Minnesota officials control air pollution

    Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) administrators effectively managed numerous air pollutants over the past two years. According to Minnesota Public Radio News, these officials improved air quality in the Twin Cities by focusing on fine particle pollution.

    Recent MPCA data showed that the Twin Cities area averages roughly 10 air quality alerts in most years. However, there were only four such alerts in both 2011 and 2012.

    Air quality warnings are issued if pollutant levels are unhealthy for certain groups, including people who have respiratory problems. MPCA official Rich Strassman said that the recent reduction in the number of warnings is a positive sign for the state, but noted that the weather also impacted the agency's calculations.

    "We can probably attribute it to some fairly active weather in 2012, where the concentrations just didn't accumulate over multiple days like we've seen in the past," Strassman told the news source.

    The Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier features premium carbon technology that absorbs hazardous organic compounds such as benzene and toluene. This air purifier can eliminate dangerous and unpleasant odors and has a large coverage area.

  • Clean-air supporters target Minnesota power plant

    Six groups of clean-air advocates have filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reduce emissions at a Minnesota power plant. According to the Sherburne County Citizen, the clean-air supporters claim that officials at the Sherco power plant in Becker, Minnesota, need to employ the best available technology to reduce emissions.

    Kevin Reuther, legal director for the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy, said he feels Sherco, which operates the largest power plant in Minnesota, is releasing emissions that could cause heart and lung disease throughout the state.

    "Sherco is a huge emissions source," Reuther told the news source. "People don't realize that when they are way up in the Boundary Waters [Canoe Area Wilderness] they are breathing emissions from the plant in Sherburne County."

    The clean-air supporters are suing the EPA in the hopes that the agency will order Sherco to update its technology. Group members claim that the pollution from the coal-fired Sherco plant is a major contributor to haze that obscures views of some of the state's national parks.

    With the Airgle® PurePal® AG800 Air Purifier, people can use a high-end, medical-grade unit to remove molecular and particulate pollutants. The air purifier has an ultra-quiet design and registers an extremely low 33 dB while continuously cleaning the air.

  • Illinois official sues publishing firm due to air pollution concerns

    Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is attempting to reduce air pollution by examining the conditions surrounding a local printing plant. According to the Chicago Tribune, Madigan filed a lawsuit against Lake Book Manufacturing Inc. after the company installed 10 printing presses without construction permits.

    The printing presses are capable of emitting air pollutants, and Lake Book Manufacturing could be penalized up to $50,000 for each violation and an extra $10,000 for every day it illegally operated the units. Lake Book Manufacturing's printing machines could produce more than 25 tons of volatile organic materials per year.

    Madigan said that Lake Book Manufacturing did not submit annual emissions reports to the state's Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from 1992 to 2010. Illinois EPA officials investigated the company's facility in November 2010 and found that the firm had not paid permit fees associated with the printing presses.

    With the Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier, people can enjoy advanced particle filtration and molecular control. The air purifier uses enhanced technology to destroy bacteria and viruses and safely break down dangerous chemicals and odors.

  • EPA announces new air pollution standards for industrial boilers

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released new regulations in regards to cement kilns, incinerators and industrial boilers on December 21, 2012. According to The New York Times, the standards focus on reducing acid gas, mercury and small-particle emissions across the country.

    Several officials with the National Association of Manufacturers noted that the compliance expenses associated with the rules could cost companies up to $14 billion. These administrators said that the additional EPA regulations may limit expansion opportunities for some businesses.

    However, the EPA estimates that air quality improvements to comply with the new regulations could cost manufacturers around $2 billion. The standards are also designed to give companies several years to comply to reduce the impact on employees and operations.

    With the Airgle® PurePal® MultiGas AG950 Air Purifier, business leaders can effectively control molecular pollutants such as dust, pollen and smoke. The air purifier features 15 pounds of activated carbon, performs at over 320 CADR and addresses everything from particle filtration to microbiological control. Additionally, the unit has a cutting-edge design and meets ENERGY STAR requirements.

  • Pennsylvania industrial supply company cited for Clean Air Act violations

    Scully's Welding Supply Corp., a Pennsylvania company that specializes in full-service welding and industrial products, received $60,000 in fines due to Clean Air Act penalties. The Delaware County Daily Times reports that the company was investigated by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials after several explosions at the business' location in Collingdale, Pennsylvania, in September 2010.

    EPA administrators found that Scully's failed to comply with the Clean Air Act's "General Duty Clause," which requires businesses to take precautions if they handle explosive gases. This clause is intended to protect workers against possible toxic chemical releases and accidents.

    "It is important for companies that handle extremely hazardous substances to identify potential releases to air [and] to design and maintain a safe facility," EPA spokesperson Bonnie Smith told the news source. 

    Scully's officials said the company is now in compliance with the Clean Air Act, but did not admit liability for the September 2010 explosions.

    Companies like Scully's can safeguard workers against molecular pollutants with the Airgle® PurePal® MultiGas AG950 Air Purifier. The system performs at over 320 CADR while also meeting ENERGY STAR requirements. 

  • Research shows air pollution is a significant global problem

    Recent statistics reflect air pollution's impact on people across the globe. According to Time Magazine, a December 2012 analysis published in Lancet showed that more than 3.2 million people suffered premature deaths due to air pollution in 2010.

    U.S. officials have instituted new policies and technologies to help reduce air pollution. The news source notes that urban air is cleaner in the United States and other developed nations than it was 30 to 40 years ago, thanks in part to an increased focus on air quality.  

    Additionally, computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, recently introduced a new smartphone app that could help safeguard Americans against air pollution. Gizmag reports that these researchers created a portable sensor that measures local concentrations of several harmful pollutants, including carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. The device wirelessly transmits data to users' smartphones, which enables them to evaluate the air quality in numerous locations.

    The Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier is a high-end system that helps protect people against potentially dangerous chemicals, odors and particles. This air purifier features an ultra-quiet design and metal-frame housing, which make it ideal for efficient removal of harmful allergens and pollutants. 

  • EPA releases annual pollution enforcement report

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released statistics in regards to its annual pollution enforcement on December 17, 2012. Agency officials said they eliminated 2.2 billion pounds of air, water and land pollution over the past year. Additionally, EPA administrators noted that $252 million in civil and criminal penalties were levied in 2012.

    Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, said enforcement was crucial for officials, as administrators used new initiatives to help reduce pollution across the country.

    “We are using vigorous enforcement, as well as innovations in monitoring and transparency, to reduce pollution violations, protect and empower communities and focus on the environmental problems that matter most," Giles said.

    An innovative enforcement actions map was one of several tools that EPA officials provided to communities. The map was designed to increase public accountability to improve environmental compliance and includes information about violators throughout the nation.

    People might appreciate a quality air purifier that uses advanced micro- and nano-filter technologies to effectively remove particulate air pollutants - the IQAir® HealthPro. The air purifier eliminates micro-particles such as mold spores, pet dander and pollen, and features HyperHEPA® filtration that removes bacteria, viruses and combustion particles from automobiles and smoke.

  • EPA examines regulations to control soot pollution

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently finalized air quality standards designed to protect Americans from soot pollution. Fine particles can cause serious health effects such as heart attacks and strokes, and the updated air quality standards are designed to help U.S. counties further protect citizens against these dangers.

    Agency officials said that they anticipate that 99 percent of U.S. counties could meet the revised health standard by 2020, without any additional action.

    "These standards are fulfilling the promise of the Clean Air Act," EPA representative Lisa P. Jackson said. "We will save lives and reduce the burden of illness in our communities."

    Fewer than 10 U.S. counties will need to perform actions to reduce fine particle pollution to meet the new standard, which is mandated by the Clean Air Act. Meanwhile, the remaining counties can follow existing federal guidelines to meet the new standard.

    Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier features enhanced technology to protect people against dust, pollen and other harmful particles. The air purifier is efficient and has 50 square feet of premium HEPAfast media to quickly remove irritating allergens.

  • Utah officials to develop new air pollution strategy

    The Utah Air Quality Board will create new air pollution guidelines after it deemed its previous standards insufficient. According to The Associated Press, board members said they intend to develop tougher regulations for Salt Lake City and much of the northern Utah urban sector.

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrators had set December 14, 2012, as the deadline for Utah leaders to establish up-to-date air pollution standards. However, Utah officials said they will miss the deadline, as these representatives will have more time to develop stricter policies for oil refineries and other industrial facilities.

    "It's better to have the right plan late than the wrong plan on time," Bruce Bird, director of the Utah Division of Air Quality, told the news source.

    Richard Mylott, an EPA spokesperson, noted that agency officials expect Utah leaders to work diligently to institute new air pollution regulations.

    A quality air purifier like the Airgle® PurePal® Plus AG850 Air Purifier absorbs many volatile compounds, including benzene, toulene and xylene. This air purifier eliminates potentially dangerous odors from chemicals, gases and hazardous molecular pollutants.

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