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  • Avoidance is key for environmental allergy sufferers

    Environmental allergies are annoying, but in reality, most people can handle itchy eyes, runny noses and scratchy throats with help from OTC medication or by installing a medical-grade air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus for relief at home. Such steps are the best options, since clinics around the nation are full of patients looking to ease their side effects, even though avoidance is truly the best medicine, CBS affiliate WJZ 13 reports. 

    The news outlet spoke with Dr. Julia Montejo, an allergist at Fairview Clinics in Minnesota, who said that pollen counts are currently higher than they've been in recent years and that issues like grass and ragweed will be sticking around for longer than usual, meaning allergy patients are likely to feel the effects more than they have in the past. 

    Though staying inside more frequently during peak allergy season is the biggest tip Montejo offers, she added that finding an allergist is another important step. This way, people are able to figure out exactly what they're allergic to and can work harder to avoid certain places like baseball fields or parks, if they are found to be severely allergic to specific environmental  factors.

  • Date night ideas for the allergy-prone

    Allergies, especially those related to environmental issues like pollen or ragweed, can make it unpleasant to have a picnic, head to the beach or go on any other common date outings. Even though some couples may be allergy-free, chances are one, if not both partners will experience mild or severe symptoms in spring, summer and fall. In fact, it's estimated that one in five American adults are inflicted with at least one allergy or asthma symptom, WebMD reports. 

    Though it may seem like there is nothing to do with a date except watch movies at your home, if you have a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus, there are a few other ideas to keep in mind. 

    The experts at Huffington Post recommend taking a new date to a museum or art gallery. Not only will doing so show you're interested in culture and the arts, but since such facilities are in charge of keeping valuable items safe, many boast air purifiers and other air quality measures to avoid moisture or germs from harming the goods. This makes museums high on the list of allergy-friendly date night outings. On the same note, taking in a comedy show could be equally as fun, while helping you relax, working to reduce any inflammation or other side effects linked to allergies. 

  • Early exposure to air pollution tied to increase in asthma cases

    Asthma is a common issue in the U.S., and new research from the University of California, San Francisco, shows early exposure to air pollution could play a role in who goes on to develop the condition later in life. The new study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, found this to be the case among a large group of minorities.

    Scientists recruited and checked up on more than 3,300 Latino and 970 African American patients who were born in the U.S. From the collected data, researches noticed that for every five parts per billion increase in nitrogen dioxide exposure (NO2), a component of vehicle air pollution, in an infant's first year of life, the child had a 17 percent higher risk of developing asthma as they aged.

    The American Lung Association reports asthma is among the most common chronic disorders in childhood, affecting more than 7 million kids under the age of 18. Though more research needs to be conducted to verify the recent findings, it seems there is some link between air pollution and asthma. Parents can help their youngsters breathe better by installing a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir GC Multigas in their homes. 

  • Asthma patients could be worse off this summer

    Though some people might find their allergy and asthma symptoms are worse during the spring and fall months, other experts have reported that such side effects can occur year-round, and could be the most prevalent during summer. WBTV recently spoke with Dr. Maeve O'Connor, an allergist and immunologist who discussed what is most likely to trigger an asthma or allergy attack and when.

    According to O'Connor, grass pollens and mold spores are the most common forms of allergens during the hotter, summer months, leading to a rise in itchy eyes, coughing and wheezing as well as asthma flare-ups. Luckily, there are ways to keep such symptoms at bay.

    UPI reports there are many simple tricks and tips people can adhere to during peak allergy season to gain some relief. Installing a medical-grade air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus will work to limit how much pollen and other allergens get into the home, while picking up eye drops or OTC allergy medicine can also keep annoying side effects at bay. 

    Despite the ease and style contact lenses offer people, the news outlet reports that opting to wear glasses when the pollen count is high can limit how itchy or red eyes get. 

  • Asthma patients could be worse off this summer

    Though some people might find their allergy and asthma symptoms are worse during the spring and fall months, other experts have reported that such side effects can occur year-round, and could be the most prevalent during summer. WBTV recently spoke with Dr. Maeve O'Connor, an allergist and immunologist who discussed what is most likely to trigger an asthma or allergy attack and when.

    According to O'Connor, grass pollens and mold spores are the most common forms of allergens during the hotter, summer months, leading to a rise in itchy eyes, coughing and wheezing as well as asthma flare-ups. Luckily, there are ways to keep such symptoms at bay.

    UPI reports there are many simple tricks and tips people can adhere to during peak allergy season to gain some relief. Installing a medical-grade air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus will work to limit how much pollen and other allergens get into the home, while picking up eye drops or OTC allergy medicine can also keep annoying side effects at bay. 

    Despite the ease and style contact lenses offer people, the news outlet reports that opting to wear glasses when the pollen count is high can limit how itchy or red eyes get. 

  • Dwindling salamander population sparks pollution talks

    With a name like hellbender, it's no wonder that the largest salamanders in the Western hemisphere have survived for millions of years - evolving just enough to live when dinosaurs couldn't, according to The Nature Conservancy. Despite its once healthy hold in places like Missouri, Virginia and Arkansas, the hellbender population is rapidly declining, and many blame environmental pollution for the demise. 

    The salamanders, who live near fresh streams and rivers in these parts, have been dying off at faster rates in recent years and scientists are worried it's an indication of just how bad pollution levels have gotten. 

    "Hellbenders tell us that our streams are healthy," Kimberly Terrell, a wildlife biologist with the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington told the Richmond Times-Dispatch. "If the hellbenders start disappearing, there is probably something wrong with our streams. And most of us live downstream from hellbenders."

    Terrell added that many of the problems hellbenders face people polluting the streams, while issues with air quality also threaten their existence. 

    Air and environmental pollution levels continue to be high around the nation, with rates expected to increase rapidly during the hotter months. Those living in high traffic areas might benefit from investing in a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas to breathe easy at home. 

  • Tick bites tied to red meat allergy

    It's well known that deer ticks can carry Lyme disease, meaning those who get bit by one of these ticks have a chance of developing the condition. Though most people check for ticks after they spend periods of time outdoors, a new issue that could come from tick bites, becoming allergic to red meat, may ensure all individuals do a thorough check for these insects. 

    According to Discover magazine, special attention is being paid to the Amblyomma americanum, or lone star ticks, as it has been found they have the ability to make people grow allergic to burgers, steak and other red meat. Lone star ticks are different than deer ticks, so they don't carry Lyme disease, just the meat allergen. Side effects of the allergen include getting hives every time a person eats red meat. 

    To avoid having to miss out on grilling favorites, Fox News recommends figuring out how common lone star ticks are the region and making sure you arm yourself and your family with proper tick and bug protection. Performing thorough tick checksin between toes, fingers and armpits is another important step. 

    Though it is possible to develop Lyme disease or an allergy to red meat by being bitten by certain ticks, it's far more likely that you'll be affected by seasonal allergies due to pollen. These allergy sufferers can prevent itchy eyes and wheezing at home by installing a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus to breathe easy.

  • At-home allergy test could ease side effects

    Allergies, whether caused by food, pets or environmental issues, are common in the U.S. In fact, more than half (55 percent) of the entire U.S. population has at least one allergy, while a child with two parents with allergies has a 70 percent chance of developing one or more allergies, WebMD reports.

    Though some people might just assume they have seasonal allergies based on the runny noses, cough and itchy eyes they develop come spring, getting a clear-cut answer has never been simpler. USA Today reports the FDA recently approved a new kit, MyAllergyTest, to offer people a chance to figure out if they have allergies and what they are allergic to from the comfort of their homes.

    As of now, the kit tests for Bermuda grass, cats, cedar, egg whites, house dust mites, milk, mold ragweed, Timothy grass and wheat. After undergoing the test, people can easily figure out what triggers their specific allergy (if they are found to have one) and ways to curb such issues via a secure website that those who purchase the kit can log on to. For example, a person with seasonal allergies might learn that investing in a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir HealthProPlus could help them breathe better at home during peak pollen season. 

    Despite the potential benefits, ImmuneTech, the company that created the kit, is quick to point out the test is meant to expose allergens people may have, rather than replace physicians or allergy specialists. 

  • New York City residents in for high-pollution summer

    Air pollution is a major issue around the nation, despite an effort to reduce the problem. The American Lung Association's (ALA) State of the Air report was recently released and even though air quality in the U.S. is the cleanest on record, nearly 41 percent of all residents still live in areas with above-healthy levels. 

    One city that continues to deal with major pollution, mainly caused by vehicle emissions, is New York City. The ALA recently addressed this problem by informing all residents that air pollution levels are predicted to increase dramatically during the summer months. 

    "With these increased temperatures comes the increased threat of hazardous levels of ozone pollution," Jeff Seyler, president and CEO of the ALA of the Northeast, said in a statement.

    In an effort to keep citizens informed and perhaps encourage them to stay inside on certain days, the ALA developed an app, "State of the Air," that works to track daily ozone and particle pollution levels based on an individual's zip code. 

    Those worried about a spike in air pollution this summer can invest in professional-grade air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas to keep harmful side effects such as wheezing, coughing or asthma attacks at bay. 

  • Global warming could be partly to blame for rise in pollen count

    Most Americans love the warm weather summer brings, but the majority is less than pleased by the pollen and other environmental allergens that also spike between spring and fall. Though such allergies are necessary to help support tree and flower growth, some people might be thinking the allergy season has grown worse over the years, and unfortunately, they're right. 

    Alyson Eberhardt, a coastal ecosystems extension specialist at the University of New Hampshire, told Foster's Daily Democrat that warmer winters mean longer summers and a boost in allergies. Eberhardt added that Superstorm Sandy and late snowstorms helped nourish plants, leading to the development of more pollen.

    "Not only do we now have a longer allergy season, but we also have a higher pollen count," Eberhardt told the news outlet. 

    Even though pollen levels will be high, affecting more than 35 million seasonal allergy sufferers, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, there are ways to curb the side effects. 

    Eberhardt told Foster's Daily Democrat that people can limit symptoms by washing their hands before bed, refraining from hanging clothes outside to dry during peak pollen season and keeping the windows closed to prevent pollen from getting in the house. Investing in a medical-grade air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus will also ensure people breathe easy at home. 

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