Shop With ConfidenceFresh Air News

Author Archives: FreshAirPro

  • Spring allergies can lead to asthma

    The weather is finally beginning to warm up and bring touches of spring to all corners of the U.S. While this is good news for many, others may be concerned about the possibility of spring allergies wreaking havoc on their lifestyles. This is a relatively normal worry for millions, but experts say that these instances of allergies may be causing asthma flare ups in individuals. 

    "Last year, because the pollen counts were so high and the allergy seasons were bad, I had my allergy patients, who've never had asthma symptoms before, get them," Dr. Rachel Szekely of the Cleveland Clinic told KABC News. "So now they have a new diagnosis of asthma." 

    Allergies are a common trigger for asthma, leaving many patients to deal with a whole new realm of respiratory problems. Szekely noted that people with asthma are very sensitive to irritants in the air, and allergy season brings these out in full force. Luckily, individuals can turn to medical-grade devices like the IQAir HealthPro Plus for help. This HEPA air purifier clears the air of a wide variety of irritants and allergens, making it easier to breathe and find relief during the spring season. 

  • Smoking bans are good for the public

    Many places around the world are implementing public smoking bans, or at least considering launching them to protect the health of residents. The Lancet recently published an analysis of the results of various smoking bans around North America and Europe, and the findings showed that these restrictions can have a major impact on personal health. 

    As much as 40 percent of the children in the world are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke, and these kids are often left dealing with respiratory conditions and other problems. According to the study, the introduction of smoking bans contributes to a drop in the number of preterm births and children diagnosed with asthma. Taking strides to improve air quality can significantly enhance health, but occasionally people have to take their well-being into their own hands. 

    "Together with the known health benefits in adults, our study provides clear evidence that smoking bans have considerable public health benefits for perinatal and child health, and provides strong support for WHO recommendations to create smoke-free public environments on a national level," said Dr. Jasper Been, one of the leaders of the study. 

    Some regions may be considering smoking bans, but anyone concerned about air quality should look into investing in a medical-grade home air purifier. Devices such as the IQAir GC MultiGas can clear smoke, odors and chemicals from a space. 

  • Kitchen ventilation is key for lung health

    When most people think about their respiratory health, they focus mainly on the air quality of the great outdoors. While concern about heavy traffic and pollution may be warranted, individuals should not overlook the potential irritants in their own homes. 

    A study published in PLOS Medicine recently connected lung problems with kitchen ventilation. Poorly ventilated spaces can lead to smoke and odors lingering about, which in turn could result in harmful chemicals sticking around. People who take steps to improve these aspects of their lives reduce the risk of the onset of pulmonary conditions. 

    Lung function is also tied to these factors. People may find it is easier to breathe when they aren't inhaling harmful byproducts constantly. 

    The research noted that individuals who want to improve the indoor air quality of their home should focus on switching up the cooking fuels they use. They can also check the ventilation of their kitchen space. Even a small change can result in massive improvements, all the while allowing devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas to clear the air of remaining irritants. 

  • Study shows stress makes allergies worse

    People who have to deal with springtime allergies often become stressed as a result. A recent study from the Ohio State University analyzed the symptoms that 179 patients dealt with over a three-month period, and the findings showed that those who had higher stress had more symptoms. Increased stress levels were tied to more frequent and severe allergy flare-ups. 

    "Stress can cause several negative effects on the body, including causing more symptoms for allergy sufferers," said Dr. Amber Patterson, an allergist. "Our study also found those with more frequent allergy flares also have a greater negative mood, which may be leading to these flares." 

    Patterson also noted that the symptoms of allergies themselves could lead to increased stress. Investing in a medical-grade device such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus, which is capable of relieving some allergies, can go a long way toward allowing individuals to relax. By clearing the air of many allergens and irritants, these home air purifiers cultivate a more comfortable environment for people. 

    Purchasing air purifiers may provide relief and peace of mind for people with allergies, but there are other options these individuals should explore along with this investment. Meditation, making time for fun and learning how to cope with stress can lead to better management of allergies. 

  • The worst cities for spring allergies

    Now that April has arrived, people all over the U.S. are purchasing their home air purifiers and stocking up on medication to prepare for the harsh allergy season. Although devices like the IQAir HealthPro Plus can have a major impact on the air quality and allergen level of an indoor space, there are a few cities around the country that are naturally worse for people with allergies. 

    The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America recently released its list of the worst cities for those with spring allergies. Urban areas were ranked based on pollen counts, the use of allergy medication by residents and the number of allergists making a living in the area. 

    Louisville, Ky., earned the No. 1 spot as the worst city for individuals with allergies this spring. It jumped four slots from last year thanks to above-average pollen counts and too few allergists to deal with all of the patients. It was closely followed by Memphis, Tenn., and Baton Rouge, La., USA Today reported.  

    People living in Los Angeles can celebrate, however. According to CNN, the California city dropped a whopping 39 places to No. 77, which will be a huge relief for many residents with allergies. 

  • Smoke-free policies provide a boost to heart health

    Many people do whatever they can to take care of their hearts, whether it is eating right, exercising or engaging in other healthy lifestyle choices. However, others who smoke in public places or work offices may be undoing all of the good efforts.

    A study presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session found that indoor smoking bans led to a significant decrease in hospital admissions for heart attacks. Because secondhand smoke is a factor in 50,000 deaths each year, the prospect of eliminating it from areas is one that is attractive to many. Not to mention, it could save lives in the process. 

    Although individuals can take steps to improve the air quality around their homes, such as by investing in a home air purifier, more needs to be done. Medical-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas are ideal for clearing the air of smoke indoors, but even they cannot protect people once they leave their homes. 

    "Health care can't just take place at the individual level. It must be multipronged, and that includes public health policies being implemented at the highest levels," said Dr. Sourabh Aggarwal, the lead investigator of the study. 

  • Smoke-free policies provide a boost to heart health

    Many people do whatever they can to take care of their hearts, whether it is eating right, exercising or engaging in other healthy lifestyle choices. However, others who smoke in public places or work offices may be undoing all of the good efforts.

    A study presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session found that indoor smoking bans led to a significant decrease in hospital admissions for heart attacks. Because secondhand smoke is a factor in 50,000 deaths each year, the prospect of eliminating it from areas is one that is attractive to many. Not to mention, it could save lives in the process. 

    Although individuals can take steps to improve the air quality around their homes, such as by investing in a home air purifier, more needs to be done. Medical-grade devices like the IQAir GC MultiGas are ideal for clearing the air of smoke indoors, but even they cannot protect people once they leave their homes. 

    "Health care can't just take place at the individual level. It must be multipronged, and that includes public health policies being implemented at the highest levels," said Dr. Sourabh Aggarwal, the lead investigator of the study. 

  • US achieves cleaner air goals

    Over the past 10 years, the U.S. has made great strides to improve its air quality. Rice University recently studied different regions of the country to determine which areas had been successful, and the results showed that most regions that had been mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency to reduce pollution achieved their goals. 

    According to the study, which was published in the Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, noted that 22 of the 23 designated regions cut back on particulate matter in the air. Many of the improvements came across entire states, including those with major metropolitan areas such as New York. 

    "It was encouraging to find that across the country, we have seen overall particulate-matter levels come down," said Daniel Cohan, a professor at Rice. "We found very slight extra improvement at monitors that were targeted the most, but regions that had to develop plans achieved pretty solid controls that didn't just pinpoint the worst monitors. And the large populations of these regions benefited." 

    While the overall air quality of the U.S. has improved, individuals can still do their part to enhance their own indoor spaces. Many choose to invest in home air purifiers such as the IQAir GC MultiGas. This professional-grade device is capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of chemicals and pollutants. 

  • Millions die due to air pollution each year

    Places all over the world are suffering from poor air quality, and that smog impacts all types of people. The World Health Organization recently released estimates stating that 7 million people died as a result of air pollution in 2012. That accounts for about 1 in 8 total global deaths. 

    Those staggering numbers underscore that air pollution is a major problem facing the world's population. In fact, the WHO claimed it is the single biggest environmental health risk facing the planet today, as it could lead to the onset of strokes, heart disease and cancer. Taking steps to improve the air quality could make a significant difference, potentially saving millions of lives. 

    "Cleaning up the air we breathe prevents noncommunicable diseases as well as reduces disease risks among women and vulnerable groups, including children and the elderly," said Dr. Flavia Bustreo, a WHO assistant director. "Poor women and children pay a heavy price from indoor air pollution since they spend more time at home breathing in smoke and soot from leaky coal and wood cook stoves." 

    The massive changes required to improve the air quality around the world begin with individual efforts. Embracing environmentally friendly practices is key, but those who want to enhance the air they breathe in the meantime may consider investing in HEPA air purifiers. Products like the IQAir GC MultiGas clear the air of a wide variety of pollutants, which can greatly improve indoor air quality. 

  • Millions die due to air pollution each year

    Places all over the world are suffering from poor air quality, and that smog impacts all types of people. The World Health Organization recently released estimates stating that 7 million people died as a result of air pollution in 2012. That accounts for about 1 in 8 total global deaths. 

    Those staggering numbers underscore that air pollution is a major problem facing the world's population. In fact, the WHO claimed it is the single biggest environmental health risk facing the planet today, as it could lead to the onset of strokes, heart disease and cancer. Taking steps to improve the air quality could make a significant difference, potentially saving millions of lives. 

    "Cleaning up the air we breathe prevents noncommunicable diseases as well as reduces disease risks among women and vulnerable groups, including children and the elderly," said Dr. Flavia Bustreo, a WHO assistant director. "Poor women and children pay a heavy price from indoor air pollution since they spend more time at home breathing in smoke and soot from leaky coal and wood cook stoves." 

    The massive changes required to improve the air quality around the world begin with individual efforts. Embracing environmentally friendly practices is key, but those who want to enhance the air they breathe in the meantime may consider investing in HEPA air purifiers. Products like the IQAir GC MultiGas clear the air of a wide variety of pollutants, which can greatly improve indoor air quality. 

1-10 of 720 total

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 72
  7. ...