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Monthly Archives: November 2013

  • Women with asthma may take more time to get pregnant

    There are a lot of factors that go into getting pregnant, but some recent research identifies respiratory issues as an element of fertility that should not be overlooked. One study examined the fertility of more than 15,000 twins, and it focused on how a diagnosis of asthma and the treatment of the chronic illness may play into conception. 

    The study found that women suffering from asthma were more likely to take longer to conceive than their counterparts. About 27 percent of women will asthma "experienced prolonged time to pregnancy," according to Medical News Today. Women whose asthma was left untreated faced even longer wait times, especially if they were over the age of 30. 

    "If you have any major medical condition that really interferes with your daily life, it's bound to also affect your conception," Dr. Avner Hershlag, the chief at the Center for Human Reproduction at North Shore University Hospital, told Live Science. "When someone is sick and asthmatic, their focus changes, from 'I'm going to get pregnant,' to 'I'm going to get better.'" 

    Controlling asthma is tremendously important, which is why many people who suffer from this chronic illness look to air purifiers for support. Models like the IQAir HealthPro Plus are capable of ridding the air of a wide variety of irritants, allowing people with asthma to breathe easier and control the issue. 

  • Prenatal exposure to pollutants may cause asthma

    The effect of air pollution on unborn children is the subject of a lot of current research. One of the latest studies found that children who are exposed to chemicals while in the womb are more likely to develop asthma by the time they turn 20 years old, according to Scientific American. 

    This isn't the first research to look at the effect pollution has on unborn children. Previously, scientists at Columbia University conducted a similar study that showed pregnant women who are exposed to air pollution could be putting children at risk for anxiety or depression, Time magazine reported. 

    "Our study provides new evidence that prenatal exposures to these air pollutants, at levels commonly encountered in New York City and other urban areas, may adversely affect child behavior," said Dr. Frederica Perera, one of the Columbia researchers, as quoted by the news source. 

    To help prevent asthma and similar health problems from impacting a child's life, many adults will want to invest in medical-grade air purifiers. These devices, such as the IQAir GC MultiGas, are capable of clearing the air of a wide variety of irritants, including second-hand smoke, cooking smells, chemicals and more. While these investments are not a guarantee that asthma won't become a problem later in life, they could provide a healthy advantage for many children. 

  • Women are more likely to develop asthma, allergies

    No one wants to deal with asthma and allergies, but many individuals are left to battle with these health issues throughout the year. Of these people, more may be women - at least according to recent research. A presentation given at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology highlighted the fact that adult females are at a higher risk for developing asthma and allergies than their male counterparts. 

    Although certain health problems are more prevalent in younger males, as people enter adulthood, the number of women who suffer from these issues grows and they become more susceptible to the medical troubles. 

    "More prepubescent males have rhinitis, asthma and food allergy than females," said Dr. Renata Engler, one of the presenters of the research. "However, roles change. When females enter young adulthood, they outnumber men in these chronic illness categories." 

    Both men and women can benefit from investing in medical-grade home air purifiers like the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device is ideal for clearing the air of many irritants that may otherwise trigger respiratory or health problems. 

  • Women are more likely to develop asthma, allergies

    No one wants to deal with asthma and allergies, but many individuals are left to battle with these health issues throughout the year. Of these people, more may be women - at least according to recent research. A presentation given at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology highlighted the fact that adult females are at a higher risk for developing asthma and allergies than their male counterparts. 

    Although certain health problems are more prevalent in younger males, as people enter adulthood, the number of women who suffer from these issues grows and they become more susceptible to the medical troubles. 

    "More prepubescent males have rhinitis, asthma and food allergy than females," said Dr. Renata Engler, one of the presenters of the research. "However, roles change. When females enter young adulthood, they outnumber men in these chronic illness categories." 

    Both men and women can benefit from investing in medical-grade home air purifiers like the IQAir HealthPro Plus. This device is ideal for clearing the air of many irritants that may otherwise trigger respiratory or health problems. 

  • Gas stoves may impact air pollution, study shows

    Many individuals choose to invest in professional-grade air filters like the IQAir GC MultiGas to improve the air quality in their homes. The driving force behind these purchases is usually to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, but some may not be aware of where these pollutants are coming from.

    According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, those who use gas stoves may be exposed to high levels of air pollution. In fact, researchers found that as many as two-thirds of households in Southern California that use natural gas burners without the proper ventilation breathe in high levels of air pollution that exceed federal health standards. 

    The most common pollutants were nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, all of which may cause respiratory problems or similar health issues, the Los Angeles Times reported. These chemicals may even create an environment more harmful than pollutants outdoors. 

    Proper ventilation may remedy many of these problems, but older homes without a working range hood or those with other issues may see stoves impact indoor air quality. As a result, choosing a home air purifier that rids the air of pollutants like gas or cooking smells could be a smart investment for any individual.

  • Gas stoves may impact air pollution, study shows

    Many individuals choose to invest in professional-grade air filters like the IQAir GC MultiGas to improve the air quality in their homes. The driving force behind these purchases is usually to clear the air of a wide variety of irritants, but some may not be aware of where these pollutants are coming from.

    According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, those who use gas stoves may be exposed to high levels of air pollution. In fact, researchers found that as many as two-thirds of households in Southern California that use natural gas burners without the proper ventilation breathe in high levels of air pollution that exceed federal health standards. 

    The most common pollutants were nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, all of which may cause respiratory problems or similar health issues, the Los Angeles Times reported. These chemicals may even create an environment more harmful than pollutants outdoors. 

    Proper ventilation may remedy many of these problems, but older homes without a working range hood or those with other issues may see stoves impact indoor air quality. As a result, choosing a home air purifier that rids the air of pollutants like gas or cooking smells could be a smart investment for any individual.

  • Asthma sends young children to the ER

    Taking a child to an emergency room can be a scary experience, but those parents of kids with asthma have to make these trips more often than many. The latest study from University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital looked at how often children with asthma were taken to the emergency room, and the results showed that these young kids visit the ER more frequently than other groups. 

    According to the data, children between the ages of 1 and 3 accounted for one-fifth of all asthma-related ER visits from people under 21. Of all the individuals who had to make these trips, about 55 percent were boys, and a disproportionate number of the visits took place in the months of September, October and November. 

    "... We identified some interesting trends that give a baseline to find better ways to help children with asthma control this very treatable disease," said Dr. Aparna Roy, lead author of the study. "These findings reinforce the need to educate parents, especially those with children at higher risk, about how to manage the disease on a day-to-day basis to avoid costly emergency visits." 

    Although many of these ER trips are sudden and unavoidable, that will not stop parents from looking for ways to help their children. That search could bring adults to a home air purifier like the IQAir HealthPro Plus, which is capable of alleviating the stress of asthma and allergies in a home. 

  • Transport trains may cause air pollution

    Many Americans know that with cold winter weather comes an increased use of heating methods. That means that many individuals need coal, oil and other types of fuel to keep their spaces warm, and before they can get these resources they need to wait to have fuel products shipped to a given location - a process that may hurt the environment. 

    A recent study from a research group at the University of Washington looked at how the transport of these heating materials affected the environment. They found that there is a large increase in the amount of coal dust in the air when trains pass, which leads to significant spikes in pollution in areas near train tracks. 

    One of the unique aspects of this study was that it was entirely funded by outside individuals who wanted to know the results. With hundreds of people donating more than $20,000 to the effort, it is clear that many Americans are concerned about the air quality around their homes. Some may turn to home air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas to improve the environment within a home, but that is only a small part of bettering the atmosphere. 

  • Idling vehicles contribute to air pollution

    Numerous studies have shown that people living near highways and heavily congested areas may experience the impact on air quality, but even those who live in suburbs or quieter regions need to be aware of the potential for pollution. A recent study, published in the journal Environmental Science Processes and Impacts, looked at how idling cars and school buses affected air quality around public schools in Cincinnati. 

    The research found that pollution in areas around schools may be measurably greater due to idling vehicles, and that poor air quality may have a negative impact on schoolchildren. 

    "Anti-idling campaigns are frequently attempted to improve air quality, but until now, no one has evaluated how effective they are," said Dr. Patrick Ryan, the lead author of the study. "The results of this study demonstrate, for the first time, that not idling is a simple and effective policy that can improve air quality at schools, especially schools with a large number of buses." 

    While this study focused on idling outside schools, homeowners may also be concerned about how vehicles are impacted their environment. Investing in medical-grade air filters like the IQAir GC MultiGas may help to clear the air in a home, and could provide some peace of mind for Americans regardless of where they live. 

  • California to track freeway emissions

    With so many studies releasing findings about the health impact of living near areas of heavy traffic, people across the U.S. are beginning to pay more attention to vehicle emissions. That is certainly true in Southern California, where the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is collected data regarding the air quality around freeways to measure pollution from traffic. 

    "This is a much-needed step to give us critical information to know how dirty the air is where people are breathing it," Frank O'Donnell, president of the advocacy group Clean Air Watch, told The Press-Enterprise. 

    Although California is set to track freeway emissions, there are no regulations for indoor settings. That makes it difficult for homeowners to track the air quality of their homes and make improvements that could help them breathe easier. For that reason, many people choose to invest in high-end home air purifiers like the IQAir GC MultiGas, which is capable of clearing the air of smoke, chemicals and similar pollutants. 

    Until the day it is possible to track all vehicle emissions and indoor air quality, homeowners may have to take measures to improve the environment in their personal space, and investing in a home air filter is a solid first step. 

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