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Reducing air pollution could mean fewer lung cancer deaths

Lung cancer can be caused by various issues ranging from smoking and family history to diet and drinking habits, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. While smoking is typically highlighted as one of the main risk factors of the disease, a new study finds air pollution could also contribute to its development.

The trials, conducted by scientists from Oregon State University and published in the journal Environmental Science and Toxicology, found that high emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be tied to lung cancer deaths in places like the U.S., Canada, France and Germany. PAHs are a group of more than 100 chemicals like those that are released from vehicle exhaust and burning wood.

Researchers discovered this after reviewing a wide range of information from 136 countries. Data they looked at included residents' average body mass, price of cigarettes, smoking rates and the amount of PAHs found in the air. From this information, scientists calculated the measure of health and pollution and how it related to lung cancer deaths in each nation. Overall, they were able to find a correlation between high PAHs and an increase in lung cancer rates, while smoking was still an obvious link as well.

Those worried about lung cancer or other medial issues they could develop due to living in high air pollution regions could invest in a professional-grade air purifier like the IQAir GC MultiGas to breathe better at home. 

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