Shop With ConfidenceFresh Air News

Monthly Archives: April 2013

  • Cities with the worst allergies

    Allergy season is fast approaching and according to many experts, the severity of allergies is set to grow substantially in the coming years. Discovery News reports that continued earlier springs have led to longer growing seasons, thus boosting the pollen count around the nation. Dr. Leonard Bielory, an allergist specialist at Rutgers Center for Environmental Prediction, estimates pollen levels will increase by 20 percent by 2020.

    Despite the growth in pollen levels in the U.S., some residents might be getting it worse than others based on the city they live in. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation (AAF) recently released its annual top 10 worst places for spring allergies list, and Tennessee takes the cake with three cities featured on the list. 

    This year's list includes Jackson, Miss.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; McAllen, Texas; Louisville, Ky.; Wichita, Kan.; Dayton, Ohio; Memphis, Tenn.; Oklahoma City, Okla. and Baton Rouge, La., while a few other cities will also see a rise in pollen levels. According to the AAF people in Springfield, Mass.; Buffalo, N.Y. and Grand Rapids, Mich. will also be hit hard with allergies in 2013. 

    Even if you don't live in one of these allergy hotspots, it doesn't mean pollution won't affect your symptoms. You might not be able to avoid itchy eyes and a runny nose while outside, but you can breathe easy at home by installing a professional-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal CleanRoom AG900.

  • Pollutants may play a role in demise of the bumblebee

    The bumblebee population has been declining in recent years, and many experts are worried about the bug's potential disappearance. Scientists have many theories on what's behind the demise of the bumblebee, though a new study shows pollution from car exhaust and industrial plants could be partly to blame. 

    The study, published in the journal Environmental Pollution, researched bumblebees' behavior and how they reacted to flowers contaminated with metals like nickel and aluminum, common pollutants in the air, and flowers free from the contaminants. From the data, scientists discovered the bees seemed to recognize when a flower was polluted with certain metals, but only after they had visited the blooms. This shows they are already subject to exposure, even if they don't go on to get nectar from polluted plants. 

    Since pollution from cars and industrial plants has the capability to greatly affect the entire bumblebee population, some may wonder what such problems might do to people. The Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health reports environmental pollutants like air pollution from traffic and pesticides, for example, put kids at a greater risk of developing respiratory conditions like asthma, cognitive defects and certain types of cancer. 

    Parents worried about the health of their families might want to install a professional-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 into their homes to keep toxins out. 

  • Early warm weather spells trouble for people with allergies

    Approximately one in five Americans currently live with either allergy or asthma symptoms, WebMD reports. While most of these sufferers may have enjoyed the low-allergy levels of winter, many news providers say people should now start preparing for the worst.

    The Daily Press reports warm weather is springing up around the country, and with it could come high allergy levels. 

    "As the temperature rises, some of the species that cause allergies are going to have a longer growing season," James Perry at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, told the publication. "So you get more pollen over more and more time."

    Not only do the rates of allergens rise because of the warm weather, how well people's immune systems are able to fight off the symptoms grows weaker, making this coming season one of the worst for allergy sufferers. 

    "We have a certain amount of immunity to some of these allergens," Perry told the newspaper. "But if we're exposed over and over and over again, we'll eventually develop a reaction. …You will wear out your immune system, because it's constantly fighting things off."

    Even though there is no way to prevent allergy symptoms all together, there are certain ways sufferers can breathe easier at home. Installing a professional-grade air purifier like the Airgle PurePal AG800 in the house is a great way to reduce the side effects of allergies. 

11-13 of 13 total

  1. 1
  2. 2