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Study finds harmful flame-retardant chemical is prevalent in offices

Office jobs are quite common in America - ranging from financiers and bloggers to bankers and salesmen and women. Even though such positions might be deemed as some of the safest in the nation, a new study finds office workers may be at risk of being exposed to a harmful flame retardant. 

Scientists from Boston University's School of Health came to this conclusion after taking urine samples from 31 people, as well as dust samples from their cars, desks and homes. Researchers were looking for a chemical called chlorinated tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, or TDCPP. The chemical, which was once used to make children's pajamas, has more recently has been used as an additive to polyurethane foam used in upholstered furniture like office chairs. TDCPP has also been found to increase people's risk of cancer.

Scientists discovered 99 percent of dust samples taken from officer workers' homes, cars and offices had a "widespread presence of this flame retardant in the indoor environment," according to the study. The authors added that the chemical was more present in older offices. 

Even though more tests need to be conducted to verify the recent findings, it might be smart for businesses to install professional-grade air purifiers like the Airgle PurePal MultiGas AG950 into their offices to help eliminate dust and dander that could contain TDCPP.

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