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Monthly Archives: August 2012

  • Air quality levels impact children's safety

    The physical environment children live in can have a significant impact on their health. Exposure to outdoor and indoor air pollutants such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and fine particulate matter can cause respiratory illnesses like asthma, according to the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.

    The source claims that in 2010, 67 percent of children  up to a maximum age of 17 years old lived in counties with air pollution levels above one or more current air quality standards set by the federal or state government. This is up from 59 percent in 2009 but down from the 77 percent recorded in 2003.

    A high concentration of air pollutants in a home can lead to physical and developmental problems in children that can affect them for the rest of their lives. Parents concerned about the impact of low air quality can invest in an IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier. The medical-grade unit is an efficient addition to any home and can improve the health and wellbeing of any child at any age.

  • How to track air pollution levels in your metro area

    With the summer’s heat increasing ozone and air pollution levels across America, many people may want to consider taking precautionary measures. The Air Quality Index (AQI) is a website that is updated daily to provide people with information about how polluted the air is outside.

    The website was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. National Park Service and other local and state agencies. Air pollution levels reported on the AGI website are calculated by the EPA and cover five major air pollutants - ground-level ozone, particulate pollution, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. Air pollution levels are reported for over 300 metro areas in the United States.

    There is a number of negative health effects caused by  increased ozone levels and other pollutants. As a result, an individual may want to consider checking air pollution levels on the AIRNow website and investing in a home air purifier. A unit such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier can reduce the presence of pollutants within a home.

  • Alaskan voters to decide air pollution issue

    Soon, Alaskan voters in Fairbanks will have the opportunity to decide whether air pollution should be regulated in the region, the Daily News Miner reports. A local group is opposed to the idea of setting a new standard that would require all new heating stoves to feature clean-burning designs. In addition, the proposal prohibits the burning of chemically treated wood, railroad ties, garbage and various other unapproved fuel sources.

    Named the Home Heating Initiative, the bill will be placed on the October ballot, and residents will vote whether or not to approve the standard.  This recent initiative goes beyond current state and federal requirements, and as such, not all politicians happy.

    "The administration failed to enact the full scope of intent of the last initiative. This language should make their deliberation process quite easy. The bottom line is the borough should not take on duties already handled by the state Department of Environmental Conservation," Representative Tammie Wilson told the news source. "A new layer of bureaucracy is unnecessary; the state has the mandate and the resources to address air quality."

    Regardless of whether the initiative passes or not, property owners in the area can invest in medical-grade home air purifiers to ensure the indoor air they are breathing is safe and clean. The IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier can remove fine particulate matter from the air for a better respiration.

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