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Monthly Archives: July 2012

  • Wisconsin improves air quality standards

    Wisconsin may seldom be mentioned when it comes to air pollution standards, but the state has recently been taking strides to reduce the production of harmful pollutants by factories and other industrial companies. Environmental Protection reported the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice reached a settlement with Dairyland Power Cooperative (DPC) that will blanket power plants in Alma and Genoa, Wisconsin. The DPC will spend $150 million to improve pollution control technology.

    "This settlement will improve air quality in Wisconsin and downwind areas by significantly reducing releases of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and other harmful pollutants," said Ignacia S. Moreno, assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the Department of Justice.

    The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin is expected to approve the settlement after a 30-day period. However, pollutants will still be leaked in some quantities, and even the strictest safety standards may not be able to prevent the release of harmful toxins. Those facing the risk of exposure to these and other harmful chemicals can invest in the IQAir GC MultiGas home air purifier. This device filters out everything from smog particles to allergens, and ensures the good health of any home occupant.

  • Is the air inside your home harming your health?

    Indoor air can contain toxic pollutants ranging from smog wafting from nearby highways to common household cleaners. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), indoor air pollution is among the top five environmental health risks Americans will experience.

    Undesirable levels of contaminants enter the home and recycle through air ventilation systems, and some mechanisms do not remove the majority of these toxins. Fine particulate matter and gaseous pollutants can aggravate and promote the development of an illness. The first includes dust, smoke, pollen, dander, tobacco smoke, mold, bacteria and other materials. The later refers to pollutants coming from combustion processes such as gas cooking stoves, vehicle exhaust and tobacco smoke.

    These and other pollutants are linked to aggravating respiratory illnesses such as asthma. In addition, these might increase a person’s risk of heart attack, stroke and even certain forms of cancer.

    Homeowners concerned about the negative impact of poor air quality can invest in an air purifier such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier. The right, medical-grade tool can reduce symptoms commonly linked to poor air quality.

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