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Monthly Archives: June 2012

  • Air pollution increases risk of recurring cardiac disease

    A recent study found long-term exposure to air pollution increases an individual’s risk of reoccurring heart attacks. According to researcher Dr. Yariv Gerber of Tel Aviv University’s School of Public Health air pollution negatively impacts cardiac illnesses and can prompt repeat episodes.

    Patients who participated in the study and lived in high pollution areas were 40 percent more likely to have a second heart attack compared to those living in low level regions, reports the source.

    "We know that like smoking cigarettes, pollution itself provokes the inflammatory system. If you are talking about long-term exposure and an inflammatory system that is irritated chronically, pollution may well be involved in the progression of atrial sclerosis that manifests in cardiac events," said Gerber, according to Science Daily.

    Homeowners, especially those with a history of cardiac illness, can purchase a home air purifier to reduce their exposure to harmful pollutants. Fine particulate matter, soot and smog - all common air pollutants - are unavoidable for many Americans. Therefore, purchasing a unit such as the IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier is an investment in good health.

  • Federal court gives the EPA a deadline on soot pollution standard

    A federal court recently ordered the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to  approve a proposed update to soot standards within one week. The EPA was brought to court by the American Lung Association and the National Parks Conservation Association. A multistate coalition also sought an update after the EPA missed an October 2011 legal deadline for amending previous standards.

    "We’re truly heartened by today’s court action. The EPA has been sitting on a rule that could save tens of thousands of avoidable premature deaths. This court decision is a win for everyone who breathes," said Earthjustice attorney Paul Cort in a statement.

    Experts have associated soot and other fine particulate matter pollution with tens of thousands of early deaths a year. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management claims approximately 50 state residents die a year from heart disease caused in part by soot pollution. Rhode Island was just one state that participated in the previously mentioned coalition.

    Homeowners wary of the hazy cloud of smog above their heads can invest in a home air purifier to reduce their long-term exposure to soot. By removing the presence of fine particulate matter in the house, a person can feel safer and breathe easier.

  • Settlement finalized between plastics producer and the EPA

    SABIC Innovative Plastics US LLC and its subsidiary, SABIC Innovative Plastics Mt. Vernon LLC, have come to an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). The settlement resolves the allegations of SABIC violating the Clean Air Act at plants in Alabama and Indiana.

    The pastics producer will pay approximately $1 million to the EPA and invest in new technology to reduce the emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The installation of new valves and pumps should allow the industrial sites to produce less pollution.

    "This compliance program continues our efforts to control fugitive emissions and will require SABIC to upgrade its monitoring and maintenance practices to help prevent future violations," said Robert G. Dreher, principal deputy assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division at the Department of Justice.

    Concerned homeowners living near industrial plants can invest in a home air purifier to reduce exposure to toxic air pollutants. Until high-quality emission controls are firmly in place, residents can protect themselves and their loved ones with an IQAir HealthPro Plus Air Purifier.

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