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Non-profits band together to fight air pollution

After recent reports regarding the decline of air quality across the world, several non-profit organizations have banded together to help reduce air pollution, reports the Huffington Post. While most of the efforts are centered around developing nations, where the problem is most visible, other efforts include educating individuals all over the world about the health hazards of air pollution and how these risks can be reduced.

Indoor air pollution is among the top health hazards in the developing world, but it is still a concern in countries such as the United States. While much of the indoor pollution is caused by open-fire cookstoves in developing nations, many households in the U.S. and other countries still use wood fires as one of their main sources of heat in the wintertime, which can produce similar results, especially in older houses, where the ventillation systems might be outdated.

"This is a large issue, and it remains mostly under the radar," said Neil Bellefeuille, a member of Nakamura's CGI panel, whose company sells clean cook stoves. "It's literally like having a campfire in the living room."

If your home is vulnerable to the effects of indoor air pollution from wood stoves, traffic emissions or other sources, be proactive about protecting your family's health. Investing in a home air purifier is one of the best ways to ensure that the air within your home is clean and free from serious risk.

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